Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Improving business school courses by applying lean principles and practices

Improving business school courses by applying lean principles and practices Describes the application of lean principles and practices to the design and delivery of a graduate business course on leadership taken by part‐time working professional students in a classroom setting. The principal objectives were to improve consistency between what was taught in the course and how the course was taught, eliminate waste, improve the quality and relevance of course materials, and deliver greater value as perceived by students. Results indicate a higher level of student satisfaction, in part through clearer expectations, less ambiguity regarding lectures and assignments, standard formats for assignments, smoothing individual and team assignments over the semester, and better management of students' time both in and outside class. This joins a growing body of work that demonstrates the applicability of lean principles and practices to service businesses, and the achievement of improved outcomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality Assurance in Education Emerald Publishing

Improving business school courses by applying lean principles and practices

Quality Assurance in Education , Volume 12 (4): 13 – Dec 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/improving-business-school-courses-by-applying-lean-principles-and-CYFmpdoF5X

References (76)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0968-4883
DOI
10.1108/09684880410561596
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Describes the application of lean principles and practices to the design and delivery of a graduate business course on leadership taken by part‐time working professional students in a classroom setting. The principal objectives were to improve consistency between what was taught in the course and how the course was taught, eliminate waste, improve the quality and relevance of course materials, and deliver greater value as perceived by students. Results indicate a higher level of student satisfaction, in part through clearer expectations, less ambiguity regarding lectures and assignments, standard formats for assignments, smoothing individual and team assignments over the semester, and better management of students' time both in and outside class. This joins a growing body of work that demonstrates the applicability of lean principles and practices to service businesses, and the achievement of improved outcomes.

Journal

Quality Assurance in EducationEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2004

Keywords: Business schools; Customers; Education; Quality improvement; Value added

There are no references for this article.