Implications of low red meat consumption for iron status of young people in Britain

Implications of low red meat consumption for iron status of young people in Britain The purpose of this paper is to decide whether consumption of red and processed meat is associated with iron intakes and/or iron status among young people in Britain. Data from The National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Young People Aged 4‐18 Years was used. A total of 1,169 respondents completed a seven‐day weighed dietary record and provided a blood sample for iron status. Supplement‐users were excluded. RPM was defined as all red meat, meat products and offal excluding white meat. Found that, among girls, iron intakes were low but RPM was not associated with iron intake; boys were less prone to low iron intakes. Opines that low consumption of red meat has adverse implications for iron status. Dietary advice needs to emphasise the importance of bio‐available iron sources (such as meat) as well as other factors that increase iron bioavailability. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition & Food Science Emerald Publishing

Implications of low red meat consumption for iron status of young people in Britain

Nutrition & Food Science, Volume 34 (6): 7 – Dec 1, 2004

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0034-6659
DOI
10.1108/00346650410568309
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to decide whether consumption of red and processed meat is associated with iron intakes and/or iron status among young people in Britain. Data from The National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Young People Aged 4‐18 Years was used. A total of 1,169 respondents completed a seven‐day weighed dietary record and provided a blood sample for iron status. Supplement‐users were excluded. RPM was defined as all red meat, meat products and offal excluding white meat. Found that, among girls, iron intakes were low but RPM was not associated with iron intake; boys were less prone to low iron intakes. Opines that low consumption of red meat has adverse implications for iron status. Dietary advice needs to emphasise the importance of bio‐available iron sources (such as meat) as well as other factors that increase iron bioavailability.

Journal

Nutrition & Food ScienceEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2004

Keywords: Surveys; Diet; Meat; Natural products; Age groups

References

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