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Implementing a psychologically informed environment in a service for homeless young people

Implementing a psychologically informed environment in a service for homeless young people Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the attempts by one youth homelessness service to implement the conceptual ideas of the psychologically informed environment (PIE) into a practical and beneficial service for very challenging young people who have been homeless, are leaving care or have left custody. Design/methodology/approach – The approach of the paper is descriptive, outlining the thinking behind a PIE with young people and the operationalising of this understanding in the day‐to‐day practice of the service. Findings – Although homelessness and housing support staff are not therapists, the nature of the work entails a need for understanding and sensitivity, and the activities of the service are designed to create positive opportunities and relationships. Reflective practice, supervision and evaluation are then essential tools in developing a “learning organisation”, where the collective dynamics at an organisational level support the psychological work of the PIE. Research limitations/implications – The implications for homelessness work that can be drawn from the outcome of this project is to better understand how the PIE linked to the concept of a learning organisation can provide a truly robust framework for providing a service that can evolve harmoniously, tying in disparate funding streams to offer very challenging young people an outstanding service that addresses their homelessness and its underlying causes. Practical implications – The practical implications shown are the psychological skills that can be developed in housing workers; the limits of those skills and how they are complemented by partnership work with other voluntary sector organisations and mainstream health providers; how the ideas of the learning organisation can naturally underpin the work of the PIE. Originality/value – The combination of the concept of the learning organisation, reflective practice and the PIE provides a highly original and truly robust framework for providing housing workers with the psychological tools to make a transformative difference in the lives of especially vulnerable young homeless people. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Housing, Care and Support Emerald Publishing

Implementing a psychologically informed environment in a service for homeless young people

Housing, Care and Support , Volume 17 (1): 10 – Mar 12, 2014

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1460-8790
DOI
10.1108/HCS-12-2013-0024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the attempts by one youth homelessness service to implement the conceptual ideas of the psychologically informed environment (PIE) into a practical and beneficial service for very challenging young people who have been homeless, are leaving care or have left custody. Design/methodology/approach – The approach of the paper is descriptive, outlining the thinking behind a PIE with young people and the operationalising of this understanding in the day‐to‐day practice of the service. Findings – Although homelessness and housing support staff are not therapists, the nature of the work entails a need for understanding and sensitivity, and the activities of the service are designed to create positive opportunities and relationships. Reflective practice, supervision and evaluation are then essential tools in developing a “learning organisation”, where the collective dynamics at an organisational level support the psychological work of the PIE. Research limitations/implications – The implications for homelessness work that can be drawn from the outcome of this project is to better understand how the PIE linked to the concept of a learning organisation can provide a truly robust framework for providing a service that can evolve harmoniously, tying in disparate funding streams to offer very challenging young people an outstanding service that addresses their homelessness and its underlying causes. Practical implications – The practical implications shown are the psychological skills that can be developed in housing workers; the limits of those skills and how they are complemented by partnership work with other voluntary sector organisations and mainstream health providers; how the ideas of the learning organisation can naturally underpin the work of the PIE. Originality/value – The combination of the concept of the learning organisation, reflective practice and the PIE provides a highly original and truly robust framework for providing housing workers with the psychological tools to make a transformative difference in the lives of especially vulnerable young homeless people.

Journal

Housing, Care and SupportEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 12, 2014

Keywords: Homeless; Young people; Learning organization; Attachment; Trauma; Psychologically informed environment

References