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Impact of Centor scores on determining antibiotic prescribing in children

Impact of Centor scores on determining antibiotic prescribing in children PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to establish the effect of incorporating Centor scoring into antibiotic prescribing in primary care in London, UK, before and after the introduction of an educational package and prescribing software tool.Design/methodology/approachA quality improvement project with analysis of all sore throat presentations in patients aged 3-14 years, in two phases. Phase 1 (retrospective): 1 January-31 December 2013, followed by an intervention (software tool/education package) and Phase 2 (prospective): 1 March 2014-28 February 2015.FindingsIn the initial analysis, 162 out of 202 (80.2 per cent) patients were prescribed antibiotics. Following the educational/software intervention, 191 out of 231 (82.7 per cent) patients were prescribed antibiotics (p=0.56, χ2 test). The mean Centor score decreased significantly following the education/software intervention (3.1 vs 2.7, p<0.001, χ2 test). In all, 100 per cent of patients with tonsillar exudate were prescribed antibiotics in both phases. The apparent order of importance for predictive signs/symptoms given by the prescribers in both phases of the study was tonsillar exudate>lymphadenopathy>fever>absence of cough.Originality/valueThis is the first time a differential importance given by practitioners on individual Centor criteria has been described. With a low probability of bacterial infection, children with exudate or anterior lymphadenopathy almost always received antibiotics. This is interesting, since studies have previously found that the presence of tonsillar exudate had no significant association with culture-confirmed streptococcal tonsillitis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance Emerald Publishing

Impact of Centor scores on determining antibiotic prescribing in children

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0952-6862
DOI
10.1108/IJHCQA-08-2016-0114
pmid
28470130
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to establish the effect of incorporating Centor scoring into antibiotic prescribing in primary care in London, UK, before and after the introduction of an educational package and prescribing software tool.Design/methodology/approachA quality improvement project with analysis of all sore throat presentations in patients aged 3-14 years, in two phases. Phase 1 (retrospective): 1 January-31 December 2013, followed by an intervention (software tool/education package) and Phase 2 (prospective): 1 March 2014-28 February 2015.FindingsIn the initial analysis, 162 out of 202 (80.2 per cent) patients were prescribed antibiotics. Following the educational/software intervention, 191 out of 231 (82.7 per cent) patients were prescribed antibiotics (p=0.56, χ2 test). The mean Centor score decreased significantly following the education/software intervention (3.1 vs 2.7, p<0.001, χ2 test). In all, 100 per cent of patients with tonsillar exudate were prescribed antibiotics in both phases. The apparent order of importance for predictive signs/symptoms given by the prescribers in both phases of the study was tonsillar exudate>lymphadenopathy>fever>absence of cough.Originality/valueThis is the first time a differential importance given by practitioners on individual Centor criteria has been described. With a low probability of bacterial infection, children with exudate or anterior lymphadenopathy almost always received antibiotics. This is interesting, since studies have previously found that the presence of tonsillar exudate had no significant association with culture-confirmed streptococcal tonsillitis.

Journal

International Journal of Health Care Quality AssuranceEmerald Publishing

Published: May 8, 2017

References