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Imag‐ining ourselves: illustration and identity in the New Zealand School Journal

Imag‐ining ourselves: illustration and identity in the New Zealand School Journal Interest in the role of the New Zealand School Journal as an officially sanctioned publication for schools, has resulted in a number of past studies exploring its relationship to official curriculum, educational policy and wider socio‐political developments, largely in relation to the written text. This article focuses on selected visual imagery, drawing on a masters study that examined discourses of art and identity through an interdisciplinary approach. Primary sources such as the School Journal publications themselves, material from the National Archives, and the stories of illustrators (gathered through a variety of communications including oral history), contributed a range of voices to the research. This article addresses some of the themes identified in relation to post World War 2 discourses of identity seeking to construct a sense of New Zealandness in educational publications. Acknowledging the role of imagery in educational publication itself offers another voice in constructing our educational history. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

Imag‐ining ourselves: illustration and identity in the New Zealand School Journal

History of Education Review , Volume 37 (2): 11 – Oct 14, 2008

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/08198691200800012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Interest in the role of the New Zealand School Journal as an officially sanctioned publication for schools, has resulted in a number of past studies exploring its relationship to official curriculum, educational policy and wider socio‐political developments, largely in relation to the written text. This article focuses on selected visual imagery, drawing on a masters study that examined discourses of art and identity through an interdisciplinary approach. Primary sources such as the School Journal publications themselves, material from the National Archives, and the stories of illustrators (gathered through a variety of communications including oral history), contributed a range of voices to the research. This article addresses some of the themes identified in relation to post World War 2 discourses of identity seeking to construct a sense of New Zealandness in educational publications. Acknowledging the role of imagery in educational publication itself offers another voice in constructing our educational history.

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 14, 2008

Keywords: Art; Identity; New Zealand; Education; Imagery; Journal;

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