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Identity and difference – re-thinking UK South Asian entrepreneurship

Identity and difference – re-thinking UK South Asian entrepreneurship PurposeThis paper, which is part of a larger study, aims to discuss from an ethno-cultural perspective, the notion of self-identification and difference pertaining to first and second-generation South Asian male entrepreneurs. In essence, previous studies have not explored this dimension to any sufficient depth. Therefore, evidence is unclear as to how ethno-culture has informed entrepreneurial identity and difference.Design/methodology/approachAdopting a phenomenological research paradigm, 42 semi-structured interviews were conducted with first- and second-generation Sikh and Pakistani Muslim male entrepreneurs in Greater London. A typology of second-generation entrepreneurs is developed and a research agenda proposed.FindingsFirst-generation respondents regard the UK as home and do not suffer from shifts in identity. These particular respondents identify themselves as Sikh or Pakistani Muslim or a Businessman. However, the second-generation identify themselves via three distinct labels. Here respondents stress their ethnicity by using Hyphenated British identities or hide their ethnicity behind the term a Normal Businessman, or appear opportunists by using ethnicity as a resource to espouse a true entrepreneurial identity.Research limitations/implicationsThe research environment within the Greater London area where the respondents are located may not be as generalisable when compared with other parts of the UK.Originality/valueThis paper offers a unique insight into self-prescribed identity and difference noted among London’s ethnic entrepreneurs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy Emerald Publishing

Identity and difference – re-thinking UK South Asian entrepreneurship

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1750-6204
DOI
10.1108/JEC-04-2016-0012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThis paper, which is part of a larger study, aims to discuss from an ethno-cultural perspective, the notion of self-identification and difference pertaining to first and second-generation South Asian male entrepreneurs. In essence, previous studies have not explored this dimension to any sufficient depth. Therefore, evidence is unclear as to how ethno-culture has informed entrepreneurial identity and difference.Design/methodology/approachAdopting a phenomenological research paradigm, 42 semi-structured interviews were conducted with first- and second-generation Sikh and Pakistani Muslim male entrepreneurs in Greater London. A typology of second-generation entrepreneurs is developed and a research agenda proposed.FindingsFirst-generation respondents regard the UK as home and do not suffer from shifts in identity. These particular respondents identify themselves as Sikh or Pakistani Muslim or a Businessman. However, the second-generation identify themselves via three distinct labels. Here respondents stress their ethnicity by using Hyphenated British identities or hide their ethnicity behind the term a Normal Businessman, or appear opportunists by using ethnicity as a resource to espouse a true entrepreneurial identity.Research limitations/implicationsThe research environment within the Greater London area where the respondents are located may not be as generalisable when compared with other parts of the UK.Originality/valueThis paper offers a unique insight into self-prescribed identity and difference noted among London’s ethnic entrepreneurs.

Journal

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global EconomyEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 6, 2017

References