Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

‘I always had to be a teacher’: Gladys Ward and State elementary school teaching as a career for women in twentieth century South Australia

‘I always had to be a teacher’: Gladys Ward and State elementary school teaching as a career for... Case study builds upon Kay Whitehead’s detailed empirical work with respect to South Australia. Equally pertinent is Whitehead’s and Thorpe’s analysis of historical discourses of ‘vocation, career and character’ as constituting a ?matrix of subjectivity’ against which individuals construct their teacher‐selves. My methodological and conceptual approach is also informed by those historically‐situated ‘narrative inquiries’ collected in Weiler and Middleton’s book, Telling Women’s Lives, and Cunningham and Gardner’s ‘life histories’ of UK teachers in the years 1907‐1950.The authors use personal accounts (oral and written) as a major source for examining the ways in which twentieth‐century teachers constructed their own subjectivities within the context of dominant practices, institutions and discourses. Such studies give voice to women in education whose lives historians in the past have deemed insignificant ‐ none more so than the vast majority of ‘ordinary’ female classroom teachers with whom this article is centrally concerned. Thus I similarly use the privately‐printed teaching memoirs of Gladys E. Ward (Present, Miss: the story of a teacher’s life in the outback and in the city), reading the representations of herself as a ‘career teacher’ in the Primary Branch of the South Australian Education Department against the contemporary local discourses of women in teaching which framed her narrative. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

‘I always had to be a teacher’: Gladys Ward and State elementary school teaching as a career for women in twentieth century South Australia

History of Education Review , Volume 34 (2): 14 – Oct 14, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/i-always-had-to-be-a-teacher-gladys-ward-and-state-elementary-school-TJ53K9jx6L
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/08198691200500007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Case study builds upon Kay Whitehead’s detailed empirical work with respect to South Australia. Equally pertinent is Whitehead’s and Thorpe’s analysis of historical discourses of ‘vocation, career and character’ as constituting a ?matrix of subjectivity’ against which individuals construct their teacher‐selves. My methodological and conceptual approach is also informed by those historically‐situated ‘narrative inquiries’ collected in Weiler and Middleton’s book, Telling Women’s Lives, and Cunningham and Gardner’s ‘life histories’ of UK teachers in the years 1907‐1950.The authors use personal accounts (oral and written) as a major source for examining the ways in which twentieth‐century teachers constructed their own subjectivities within the context of dominant practices, institutions and discourses. Such studies give voice to women in education whose lives historians in the past have deemed insignificant ‐ none more so than the vast majority of ‘ordinary’ female classroom teachers with whom this article is centrally concerned. Thus I similarly use the privately‐printed teaching memoirs of Gladys E. Ward (Present, Miss: the story of a teacher’s life in the outback and in the city), reading the representations of herself as a ‘career teacher’ in the Primary Branch of the South Australian Education Department against the contemporary local discourses of women in teaching which framed her narrative.

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 14, 2005

Keywords: School; Teaching; Education; Women; Australia

There are no references for this article.