How professionals can lead networks in the NHS

How professionals can lead networks in the NHS Purpose – The largest organisation in the western world, the UK National Health Service (NHS), might be best viewed as a network of interdependent organisations. However, the public has only recently begun to see it as a living network. Public reforms and financial crises have increased the need for professionals to innovate and improve their role. The overarching question is how this new clinical leadership can positively affect the functioning of the system and its performance. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to clarify how leaders can be most effective in managing health networks. Design/methodology/approach – A pragmatic approach was taken because of the topical and strategic importance of networks and leadership in the current climate, and hence a need for greater understanding of this largely unknown phenomenon. A focus group interview with Organisational Development experts from the Centre for Innovation and Health Management (CIHM) at Leeds University Business School was followed by three scoping reviews and high‐level follow‐up conversations with CIHM members, network leaders from the NHS and third sectors. Findings – Issues that have emerged include: how networks are designed; which factors enhance its likelihood of success and predicate its failure; discussions of illuminating effective leadership. Research limitations/implications – The Stories of Effective Leadership Networks were provided by the network founders, who may have sought to emphasise the benefits (as opposed to downside) of their network. An ideal scenario would have been the inclusion of patients and carers and perhaps administrative staff to reduce bias. Originality/value – Considering the limited evidence base from the literature about medical leadership for network management, the involvement of network leaders and the ability to draw‐upon CIHMs knowledge and expertise has been fundamental for determining lessons that may enhance the leadership function of the UK's health system network. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Leadership in Public Services Emerald Publishing

How professionals can lead networks in the NHS

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1747-9886
DOI
10.1108/IJLPS-05-2013-0012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The largest organisation in the western world, the UK National Health Service (NHS), might be best viewed as a network of interdependent organisations. However, the public has only recently begun to see it as a living network. Public reforms and financial crises have increased the need for professionals to innovate and improve their role. The overarching question is how this new clinical leadership can positively affect the functioning of the system and its performance. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to clarify how leaders can be most effective in managing health networks. Design/methodology/approach – A pragmatic approach was taken because of the topical and strategic importance of networks and leadership in the current climate, and hence a need for greater understanding of this largely unknown phenomenon. A focus group interview with Organisational Development experts from the Centre for Innovation and Health Management (CIHM) at Leeds University Business School was followed by three scoping reviews and high‐level follow‐up conversations with CIHM members, network leaders from the NHS and third sectors. Findings – Issues that have emerged include: how networks are designed; which factors enhance its likelihood of success and predicate its failure; discussions of illuminating effective leadership. Research limitations/implications – The Stories of Effective Leadership Networks were provided by the network founders, who may have sought to emphasise the benefits (as opposed to downside) of their network. An ideal scenario would have been the inclusion of patients and carers and perhaps administrative staff to reduce bias. Originality/value – Considering the limited evidence base from the literature about medical leadership for network management, the involvement of network leaders and the ability to draw‐upon CIHMs knowledge and expertise has been fundamental for determining lessons that may enhance the leadership function of the UK's health system network.

Journal

The International Journal of Leadership in Public ServicesEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 15, 2013

Keywords: Leadership; Innovation; Networks; Healthcare; NHS; Outcomes

References

  • Inside collaborative network: ten lesson for public managers
    Agranoff, R.
  • Do networks really work? A framework for evaluating public‐sector organizational networks
    Provan, K.G.; Milward, H.B.
  • Implementing CSR through partnerships: understanding the selection, design and institutionalisation of nonprofit‐business partnerships
    Seitanidi, M.M.; Crane, A.

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