Household food consumption and expenditure 1974

Household food consumption and expenditure 1974 Annua l Report of the National Food Survey Committee HMSO price £3.50 (£3.73% by post) Thi s Report of the National Food Survey Com­ composition of meat and meat products led to slight decreases in the computed intakes of energy, mittee , publishe d on Jul y 2 , deals wit h the economic, social and nutritional aspects of household food iro n and thiamin. Also tabulated in the nutrition consumptio n in Great Britain in 1974, whe n total section are the contributions made by different consumers ' expenditure on goods and services fell foods to the total nutrient intake of large families slightly in real terms. Simultaneously, the cost of compare d with small families, and of low-income families compared with high-income families. import s of food and animal feeding-stuffs increased sharpl y and retail food prices rose relatively more Thes e contributions varied more with family size tha n other retail prices, so that the proportion of tha n with income; in particular, the large families tota l consumers' expenditure devoted to food obtaine d more of their nutrients from white bread, increase d marginally to 22% . milk, potatoes and breakfast, cereals, while the small families obtained relatively more from meat. Th e Report shows that housewives' spending on food for consumption in the hom e (exclusive of soft Th e Report presents for the first time tables drinks , alcohol, and sweets) rose by 13 % to an showin g th e difference in averag e food consumption, expenditure , prices and nutrition between house­ averag e of £3.1 0 per person per week, but as the genera l level of prices they paid for food was 15 % holds classified according to the type of tenuie highe r than in the previous year, this implies a fall unde r which they occupy their dwellings. House­ of 2 % in the real value of their food purchases; holds renting furnished accommodation recorded three-fifths of this decline was in purchases of th e highest level of food prices paid, the highest cost per calorie an d the lowest value of garde n and convenienc e foods (mainly in canned foods). This decreas e in real value was concentrated in the allotmen t supplies. Council tenants paid the lowest Januar y to Marc h quarter, when the disruption to prices, incurre d the lowest cost per calorie an d had fuel supplies and the three-day working week a low level of garde n and allotment supplies; they cause d temporary shortages of certai n products. nevertheless spent practically as muc h per head on food as the national average and obtained a Th e rise in food prices would have been greater nutrien t intake safely above the recommended ha d it not been for the introduction of subsidies on levels. Th e lowest food expenditure per head was a selected list of foods of particular importance in recorde d by occupiers of rent-free accommodation th e budgets of households in the lower income (usually service accommodation, occupied by groups . A price index for these foods, calculated virtu e of employment) but they obtained the from the Survey data, showed a rise of only 5i % highest value of garde n an d allotment produce. i n 1974 compared with a rise of 18% in a price inde x for un-subsidised foods. Household spending Th e Report also includes detailed tables of o n these subsidised foods took u p 20 % of the food averag e consumption, expenditure and prices of budge t in 1974 compare d with 21 % in the previous over 150 food items and some summarized year , and ranged from 60p per head per week in informatio n on regional, income group and family th e highest group to 74p per head in pensioner composition differences in consumption and households . Average quantities purchased changed nutrition . Also included are analyses of (a) the ver y little between the two years, although butter differences in food consumption, expenditure, increase d by 8 % at the expense of margarine. prices an d nutrition between households owning a deep-freezer, those ownin g a refrigerator, and those Estimates of the average energy value an d nut­ ownin g neither; (b) the quantities of milk being rien t content of th e diet in various types of house­ drun k in the home by children of various age hold ar e show n compare d wit h intakes recommende d group s and by other categories of person in a b y the Department of Healt h and Social Security. variet y of families; (c) the number of meals eaten Th e DHS S recommendations were exceeded for all outside the home, showing variations according to nutrient s in all groups of households except for income , family composition and geographical vitami n D and for energy and iron in some larger location ; (d) the number and source of midday families, regardless of income. (It should be noted meals eaten away from home by children of school tha t the Survey does not evaluate pharmaceutical age ; and (e) estimates of price and income intakes, an d most adults nee d no dietary vitami n D , elasticities of deman d for most of the main foods, since they obtain all they need from the action of an d of changes in deman d since 1969. sunligh t on the skin.) New analyses of the nutrient http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition & Food Science Emerald Publishing

Household food consumption and expenditure 1974

Nutrition & Food Science, Volume 76 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1976

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0034-6659
DOI
10.1108/eb059411
Publisher site
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Abstract

Annua l Report of the National Food Survey Committee HMSO price £3.50 (£3.73% by post) Thi s Report of the National Food Survey Com­ composition of meat and meat products led to slight decreases in the computed intakes of energy, mittee , publishe d on Jul y 2 , deals wit h the economic, social and nutritional aspects of household food iro n and thiamin. Also tabulated in the nutrition consumptio n in Great Britain in 1974, whe n total section are the contributions made by different consumers ' expenditure on goods and services fell foods to the total nutrient intake of large families slightly in real terms. Simultaneously, the cost of compare d with small families, and of low-income families compared with high-income families. import s of food and animal feeding-stuffs increased sharpl y and retail food prices rose relatively more Thes e contributions varied more with family size tha n other retail prices, so that the proportion of tha n with income; in particular, the large families tota l consumers' expenditure devoted to food obtaine d more of their nutrients from white bread, increase d marginally to 22% . milk, potatoes and breakfast, cereals, while the small families obtained relatively more from meat. Th e Report shows that housewives' spending on food for consumption in the hom e (exclusive of soft Th e Report presents for the first time tables drinks , alcohol, and sweets) rose by 13 % to an showin g th e difference in averag e food consumption, expenditure , prices and nutrition between house­ averag e of £3.1 0 per person per week, but as the genera l level of prices they paid for food was 15 % holds classified according to the type of tenuie highe r than in the previous year, this implies a fall unde r which they occupy their dwellings. House­ of 2 % in the real value of their food purchases; holds renting furnished accommodation recorded three-fifths of this decline was in purchases of th e highest level of food prices paid, the highest cost per calorie an d the lowest value of garde n and convenienc e foods (mainly in canned foods). This decreas e in real value was concentrated in the allotmen t supplies. Council tenants paid the lowest Januar y to Marc h quarter, when the disruption to prices, incurre d the lowest cost per calorie an d had fuel supplies and the three-day working week a low level of garde n and allotment supplies; they cause d temporary shortages of certai n products. nevertheless spent practically as muc h per head on food as the national average and obtained a Th e rise in food prices would have been greater nutrien t intake safely above the recommended ha d it not been for the introduction of subsidies on levels. Th e lowest food expenditure per head was a selected list of foods of particular importance in recorde d by occupiers of rent-free accommodation th e budgets of households in the lower income (usually service accommodation, occupied by groups . A price index for these foods, calculated virtu e of employment) but they obtained the from the Survey data, showed a rise of only 5i % highest value of garde n an d allotment produce. i n 1974 compared with a rise of 18% in a price inde x for un-subsidised foods. Household spending Th e Report also includes detailed tables of o n these subsidised foods took u p 20 % of the food averag e consumption, expenditure and prices of budge t in 1974 compare d with 21 % in the previous over 150 food items and some summarized year , and ranged from 60p per head per week in informatio n on regional, income group and family th e highest group to 74p per head in pensioner composition differences in consumption and households . Average quantities purchased changed nutrition . Also included are analyses of (a) the ver y little between the two years, although butter differences in food consumption, expenditure, increase d by 8 % at the expense of margarine. prices an d nutrition between households owning a deep-freezer, those ownin g a refrigerator, and those Estimates of the average energy value an d nut­ ownin g neither; (b) the quantities of milk being rien t content of th e diet in various types of house­ drun k in the home by children of various age hold ar e show n compare d wit h intakes recommende d group s and by other categories of person in a b y the Department of Healt h and Social Security. variet y of families; (c) the number of meals eaten Th e DHS S recommendations were exceeded for all outside the home, showing variations according to nutrient s in all groups of households except for income , family composition and geographical vitami n D and for energy and iron in some larger location ; (d) the number and source of midday families, regardless of income. (It should be noted meals eaten away from home by children of school tha t the Survey does not evaluate pharmaceutical age ; and (e) estimates of price and income intakes, an d most adults nee d no dietary vitami n D , elasticities of deman d for most of the main foods, since they obtain all they need from the action of an d of changes in deman d since 1969. sunligh t on the skin.) New analyses of the nutrient

Journal

Nutrition & Food ScienceEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1976

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