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Hospitalist programs in academic medical centers

Hospitalist programs in academic medical centers The use of hospitalists in the care of in‐patients is a relatively new phenomenon in the USA – hospitalists are delivering medical care to patients in private practice, public hospitals, and academic medical centers. Several obstacles hinder understanding of the characteristics of academic medical center‐based hospitalists. These include differences in definitions and nomenclature, differences in job descriptions, roles and administration across hospitalist programs, and in qualifications and credentialing of hospitalists versus other physicians. These differences derive from the heterogeneity of AMCs by bed size, level of local and regional competition, and cultural, utilization and referral patterns. The field needs an agreed definition of the term “hospitalist”. Assuming a good definition, one could take advantage of already good descriptive data on AMCs to quantify hospitalists within AMCs and to study how hospitalist programs vary by AMC characteristics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Governance: An International Journal Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1477-7274
DOI
10.1108/14777270410552206
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The use of hospitalists in the care of in‐patients is a relatively new phenomenon in the USA – hospitalists are delivering medical care to patients in private practice, public hospitals, and academic medical centers. Several obstacles hinder understanding of the characteristics of academic medical center‐based hospitalists. These include differences in definitions and nomenclature, differences in job descriptions, roles and administration across hospitalist programs, and in qualifications and credentialing of hospitalists versus other physicians. These differences derive from the heterogeneity of AMCs by bed size, level of local and regional competition, and cultural, utilization and referral patterns. The field needs an agreed definition of the term “hospitalist”. Assuming a good definition, one could take advantage of already good descriptive data on AMCs to quantify hospitalists within AMCs and to study how hospitalist programs vary by AMC characteristics.

Journal

Clinical Governance: An International JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2004

Keywords: Medical facilities; Patient care; Doctors

References