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Homocide co-victims: confidence in the criminal justice system

Homocide co-victims: confidence in the criminal justice system The purpose of this paper is to address the phenomenology of family members of homicide victims; known as “co-victims”. In particular, co-victims experiences of the criminal justice system (CJS) in England and Wales.Design/methodology/approachIn 2018, 10 kV methodology facilitated an electronic-focus group. Anonymously, volunteers from families of homicide victims responded to key questions in a session entitled “a conversation which matters: confidence”. The thematic analysis presents the responses to three questions around “what works” and “what does not” in CJS practice.FindingsThe responses indicate four themes in relation to confidence building: communication and information; outcome; honesty and fairness; and family support. Responses indicate three themes in relation to what the CJS does well: family liaison officers, homicide detectives and court services. Responses indicate three themes in relation to what is not working: court proceedings, police budget cuts and preventative interventions.Research limitations/implicationsThe research considers benefits and limitations of methodology and makes suggestions for how these facets could be addressed by future research.Practical implicationsThe research findings reveal good practice and points for attention to support confidence building in the CJS. Amongst other considerations, the work advances CJS practical good practice principles from the perspective of co-victims: education, interpersonal relations, working together, communication and justice.Originality/valueFindings are of value to CJS policy makers, training and education for co-victim support, police and academics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice Emerald Publishing

Homocide co-victims: confidence in the criminal justice system

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2056-3841
DOI
10.1108/jcrpp-03-2019-0020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to address the phenomenology of family members of homicide victims; known as “co-victims”. In particular, co-victims experiences of the criminal justice system (CJS) in England and Wales.Design/methodology/approachIn 2018, 10 kV methodology facilitated an electronic-focus group. Anonymously, volunteers from families of homicide victims responded to key questions in a session entitled “a conversation which matters: confidence”. The thematic analysis presents the responses to three questions around “what works” and “what does not” in CJS practice.FindingsThe responses indicate four themes in relation to confidence building: communication and information; outcome; honesty and fairness; and family support. Responses indicate three themes in relation to what the CJS does well: family liaison officers, homicide detectives and court services. Responses indicate three themes in relation to what is not working: court proceedings, police budget cuts and preventative interventions.Research limitations/implicationsThe research considers benefits and limitations of methodology and makes suggestions for how these facets could be addressed by future research.Practical implicationsThe research findings reveal good practice and points for attention to support confidence building in the CJS. Amongst other considerations, the work advances CJS practical good practice principles from the perspective of co-victims: education, interpersonal relations, working together, communication and justice.Originality/valueFindings are of value to CJS policy makers, training and education for co-victim support, police and academics.

Journal

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and PracticeEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 19, 2019

Keywords: Homicide; Family; Confidence; Murder; Good practice; Criminal justice system; Attention points; Co-victims

References