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HighLift Devices and Tailless Aeroplanes

HighLift Devices and Tailless Aeroplanes THE present conception of the air flow over aeroplane wings assumes that, in general, the flow pattern conforms closely to that of potential flow i.e. the inviscid, incompressible flow of hydrodynamic theory with the exception of a very thin layer of air which is in contact with the wing surface. This layer of fluid, the boundary layer, is characterized by the fact that all phenomena of viscosity shear forces within the fluid are restricted to it. Further, it is established that the lift is generated by a circulation about the aerofoil, and that stalling is a result of separation of the boundary layer from the wing surface at or near to the leading edge, with resulting vorticity over the dorsal wing surface, instead of an ordered flow with circulation. Thus at the stall, the circulation suffers a more or less complete breakdown. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

HighLift Devices and Tailless Aeroplanes

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 17 (10): 6 – Oct 1, 1945

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031295
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE present conception of the air flow over aeroplane wings assumes that, in general, the flow pattern conforms closely to that of potential flow i.e. the inviscid, incompressible flow of hydrodynamic theory with the exception of a very thin layer of air which is in contact with the wing surface. This layer of fluid, the boundary layer, is characterized by the fact that all phenomena of viscosity shear forces within the fluid are restricted to it. Further, it is established that the lift is generated by a circulation about the aerofoil, and that stalling is a result of separation of the boundary layer from the wing surface at or near to the leading edge, with resulting vorticity over the dorsal wing surface, instead of an ordered flow with circulation. Thus at the stall, the circulation suffers a more or less complete breakdown.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1945

There are no references for this article.