High commitment human resource practices and employee behavior: a multi-level analysis

High commitment human resource practices and employee behavior: a multi-level analysis PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between high commitment human resource practices (HCHRPs), conceptualized at the workplace level and employees’ attitudes, including affective commitment (AC) and turnover intention (TI). The study also tests the moderating role of cooperative labor–management relations (CLMR) between HCHRPs and organizational trust (OT).Design/methodology/approachBased on social exchange theory and trust commitment theory, the authors build a research model that explains employee behavior and empirically prove the model by using samples of 407 employees from South Korea. This study uses hierarchical linear regression and cross-level hypotheses based on hierarchical linear modeling.FindingsThe results demonstrate the positive impact of HCHRPs on an AC and TI, through OT. However, no moderating effect of CLMR between human resource management (HRM) practices and OT is observed.Originality/valueFew theory-based studies test the direct linkage between HRM practices and outcomes. This study is designed with a multi-level research method to provide a conceptually comprehensive and deeper understanding of how HRM practices work in an organization by testing the relationship between organizational practices and employees’ outcomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Manpower Emerald Publishing

High commitment human resource practices and employee behavior: a multi-level analysis

International Journal of Manpower, Volume 39 (5): 13 – Aug 6, 2018

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0143-7720
DOI
10.1108/IJM-09-2016-0171
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between high commitment human resource practices (HCHRPs), conceptualized at the workplace level and employees’ attitudes, including affective commitment (AC) and turnover intention (TI). The study also tests the moderating role of cooperative labor–management relations (CLMR) between HCHRPs and organizational trust (OT).Design/methodology/approachBased on social exchange theory and trust commitment theory, the authors build a research model that explains employee behavior and empirically prove the model by using samples of 407 employees from South Korea. This study uses hierarchical linear regression and cross-level hypotheses based on hierarchical linear modeling.FindingsThe results demonstrate the positive impact of HCHRPs on an AC and TI, through OT. However, no moderating effect of CLMR between human resource management (HRM) practices and OT is observed.Originality/valueFew theory-based studies test the direct linkage between HRM practices and outcomes. This study is designed with a multi-level research method to provide a conceptually comprehensive and deeper understanding of how HRM practices work in an organization by testing the relationship between organizational practices and employees’ outcomes.

Journal

International Journal of ManpowerEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 6, 2018

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