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Hey Alexa: examining the effect of perceived socialness in usage intentions of AI assistant-enabled smart speaker

Hey Alexa: examining the effect of perceived socialness in usage intentions of AI... Artificially intelligent (AI) assistant-enabled smart speaker not only can provide assistance by navigating the massive amount of product and brand information on the internet but also can facilitate two-way conversations with individuals, thus resembling a human interaction. Although smart speakers have substantial implications for practitioners, the knowledge of the underlying psychological factors that drive continuance usage remains limited. Drawing on social response theory and the technology acceptance model, this study aims to elucidate the adoption process of smart speakers.Design/methodology/approachA field survey of 391 smart speaker users were obtained. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data.FindingsMedia richness (social cues) and parasocial interactions (social role) are key determinants affecting the establishment of trust, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which, in turn, affect attitude, continuance usage intentions and online purchase intentions through AI assistants.Originality/valueAI assistant-enabled smart speakers are revolutionizing how people interact with smart products. Studies of smart speakers have mainly focused on functional or technical perspectives. This study is the first to propose a comprehensive model from both functional and social perspectives of continuance usage intention of the smart speaker and online purchase intentions through AI assistants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing Emerald Publishing

Hey Alexa: examining the effect of perceived socialness in usage intentions of AI assistant-enabled smart speaker

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2040-7122
DOI
10.1108/jrim-11-2019-0179
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Artificially intelligent (AI) assistant-enabled smart speaker not only can provide assistance by navigating the massive amount of product and brand information on the internet but also can facilitate two-way conversations with individuals, thus resembling a human interaction. Although smart speakers have substantial implications for practitioners, the knowledge of the underlying psychological factors that drive continuance usage remains limited. Drawing on social response theory and the technology acceptance model, this study aims to elucidate the adoption process of smart speakers.Design/methodology/approachA field survey of 391 smart speaker users were obtained. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data.FindingsMedia richness (social cues) and parasocial interactions (social role) are key determinants affecting the establishment of trust, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which, in turn, affect attitude, continuance usage intentions and online purchase intentions through AI assistants.Originality/valueAI assistant-enabled smart speakers are revolutionizing how people interact with smart products. Studies of smart speakers have mainly focused on functional or technical perspectives. This study is the first to propose a comprehensive model from both functional and social perspectives of continuance usage intention of the smart speaker and online purchase intentions through AI assistants.

Journal

Journal of Research in Interactive MarketingEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 21, 2021

Keywords: AI assistant; Smart speaker; Social response; Media richness; Parasocial interaction; Trust; TAM; Mobile marketing; Online marketing; Online consumer behavior; Quantitative research; Consumer behavior; Structural equation modeling; Human-computer interaction

References