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Help Me Grow Utah and the impact on family protective factors development

Help Me Grow Utah and the impact on family protective factors development The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of family protective factors in participants of Help Me Grow Utah (HMGU), a community-based system that promotes child development, seeks early detection of developmental delays, and links families to services.Design/methodology/approachIn this paper, standard quasi-experimental survey design was utilized. HMGU and control group participants completed the FRIENDS Protective Factors Survey, which was slightly modified into a retrospective pre-test and post-test format to address previous survey concerns of response-shift bias, self-serving assessments, and family maturation. Participants were asked to respond to ten questions at present and then again from the perspective of two years previous.FindingsParticipants in HMGU had statistically significant increases in protective factor scores in all but one subscale, with dramatic increases in two subscale questions on knowledge of parenting and child development. Control group scores statistically increased in four subscales, albeit at lower rates than HMGU participants. Interestingly, control group scores on two subscale questions relating to child maltreatment risk were significantly lower on post-tests as compared to their retrospective pre-test scores.Research limitations/implicationsParticipants in HMGU clearly increased in the development of protective factors. Replication of this study is recommended and the need for a control group in protective factor studies is imperative.Practical implicationsFindings from this study suggest that child services focused on enhancing knowledge of parenting and child development might also expect to improve protective factors. One-on-one care coordination with families seems particularly effective. The findings might also benefit other social programs as they utilize retrospective pre-test, post-test, and control groups in their evaluations.Originality/valueHMGU is the first affiliate to utilize retrospective pre-test/post-test methodology, which can overcome confounding results attributable to response-shift bias. Also, the use of a control group affords inclusion of natural maturation in considering findings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Children's Services Emerald Publishing

Help Me Grow Utah and the impact on family protective factors development

Journal of Children's Services , Volume 13 (1): 11 – Jun 21, 2018

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1746-6660
DOI
10.1108/jcs-05-2017-0016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of family protective factors in participants of Help Me Grow Utah (HMGU), a community-based system that promotes child development, seeks early detection of developmental delays, and links families to services.Design/methodology/approachIn this paper, standard quasi-experimental survey design was utilized. HMGU and control group participants completed the FRIENDS Protective Factors Survey, which was slightly modified into a retrospective pre-test and post-test format to address previous survey concerns of response-shift bias, self-serving assessments, and family maturation. Participants were asked to respond to ten questions at present and then again from the perspective of two years previous.FindingsParticipants in HMGU had statistically significant increases in protective factor scores in all but one subscale, with dramatic increases in two subscale questions on knowledge of parenting and child development. Control group scores statistically increased in four subscales, albeit at lower rates than HMGU participants. Interestingly, control group scores on two subscale questions relating to child maltreatment risk were significantly lower on post-tests as compared to their retrospective pre-test scores.Research limitations/implicationsParticipants in HMGU clearly increased in the development of protective factors. Replication of this study is recommended and the need for a control group in protective factor studies is imperative.Practical implicationsFindings from this study suggest that child services focused on enhancing knowledge of parenting and child development might also expect to improve protective factors. One-on-one care coordination with families seems particularly effective. The findings might also benefit other social programs as they utilize retrospective pre-test, post-test, and control groups in their evaluations.Originality/valueHMGU is the first affiliate to utilize retrospective pre-test/post-test methodology, which can overcome confounding results attributable to response-shift bias. Also, the use of a control group affords inclusion of natural maturation in considering findings.

Journal

Journal of Children's ServicesEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 21, 2018

Keywords: Child maltreatment; FRIENDS National Center for Community-based Child Abuse Prevention; Help Me Grow; Protective factors; Response-shift bias; Retrospective pre-test

References