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Have degree, will travel – well, maybe

Have degree, will travel – well, maybe PurposeThe purpose of this study is to explore pre-employment college graduates’ relocation tendencies based on a research framework built upon gender and cultural theories.Design/methodology/approachRelocation decisions were analyzed based on 208 college graduates enrolled in public universities in Texas, USA.FindingsThe relocation decision-making by college graduates differ from that for corporate employees described in previous research. First, the willingness to relocate increases as the college graduates mature. Second, gender difference in the willingness to relocate is non-significant because of the same expected norms for both genders. Instead, psychological gender affiliation, such as self-perceived masculinity, makes a difference in relocation decisions. Third, family-related variables, such as marital status and parenthood, do not influence college graduates’ relocation decisions. Last, cultural groups do not exhibit any overall significant differences.Originality/valueThe study is focused on pre-employment relocation decision-making by college graduates from different demographic backgrounds. The study fills a major research void in relocation studies by clarifying the relocation patterns of new employees graduating from college. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Resource Managementinternational Digest Emerald Publishing

Have degree, will travel – well, maybe

Human Resource Managementinternational Digest , Volume 25 (1): 3 – Jan 9, 2017

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0967-0734
DOI
10.1108/HRMID-10-2016-0133
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this study is to explore pre-employment college graduates’ relocation tendencies based on a research framework built upon gender and cultural theories.Design/methodology/approachRelocation decisions were analyzed based on 208 college graduates enrolled in public universities in Texas, USA.FindingsThe relocation decision-making by college graduates differ from that for corporate employees described in previous research. First, the willingness to relocate increases as the college graduates mature. Second, gender difference in the willingness to relocate is non-significant because of the same expected norms for both genders. Instead, psychological gender affiliation, such as self-perceived masculinity, makes a difference in relocation decisions. Third, family-related variables, such as marital status and parenthood, do not influence college graduates’ relocation decisions. Last, cultural groups do not exhibit any overall significant differences.Originality/valueThe study is focused on pre-employment relocation decision-making by college graduates from different demographic backgrounds. The study fills a major research void in relocation studies by clarifying the relocation patterns of new employees graduating from college.

Journal

Human Resource Managementinternational DigestEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 9, 2017

References