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Guest editorial improving dementia education for nurses

Guest editorial improving dementia education for nurses Guest editorial: improving dementia education for nurses Simon Burrow Programme Lead: MSc Dementia Care, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Manchester, UK Few will have been surprised to hear that the need for an higher education institutions (HEIs) in the UK. A raised informed and well educated dementia care workforce was profile for dementia-related teaching within individual one of the key priorities that came out of the consultation HEI programme curricula was related to the presence to inform the national dementia strategy for England of nursing lecturers with a special interest. Where this Living Well with Dementia: A national dementia strategy, was lacking dementia could feature well down the list of (Department of Health, 2009). Objective 13 of the Strategy teaching priorities. Unsurprisingly, the study also revealed states how ‘All health and social care staff involved in the varied – but not infrequently low or non-existent – levels of care of people who may have dementia to have the necessary dementia education in the curricular for adult (non-mental skills to provide the best quality of care in the roles and settings health) nursing programmes. where they work. To be achieved by effective basic training This http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Mental Health Training Education and Practice Emerald Publishing

Guest editorial improving dementia education for nurses

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References (3)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1755-6228
DOI
10.5042/jmhtep.2010.0497
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Guest editorial: improving dementia education for nurses Simon Burrow Programme Lead: MSc Dementia Care, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Manchester, UK Few will have been surprised to hear that the need for an higher education institutions (HEIs) in the UK. A raised informed and well educated dementia care workforce was profile for dementia-related teaching within individual one of the key priorities that came out of the consultation HEI programme curricula was related to the presence to inform the national dementia strategy for England of nursing lecturers with a special interest. Where this Living Well with Dementia: A national dementia strategy, was lacking dementia could feature well down the list of (Department of Health, 2009). Objective 13 of the Strategy teaching priorities. Unsurprisingly, the study also revealed states how ‘All health and social care staff involved in the varied – but not infrequently low or non-existent – levels of care of people who may have dementia to have the necessary dementia education in the curricular for adult (non-mental skills to provide the best quality of care in the roles and settings health) nursing programmes. where they work. To be achieved by effective basic training This

Journal

The Journal of Mental Health Training Education and PracticeEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 15, 2010

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