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Guest editorial

Guest editorial In the call for proposals for this special issue, we noted that inclusive teaching, inclusive pedagogy and inclusive education provide theoretical and practical guidance that can be used to intentionally design learning experiences that work to reduce educational inequity experienced by students who are marginalized based on their race, gender, socioeconomic status, ability status and other identity markers. As Gannon (2017) suggests, inclusive pedagogy is “a realization that traditional pedagogical methods — traditionally applied — have not served all of our students well” (para 13). Such realization should prompt educators to explore intentional pedagogies and designs that foreground inclusion, rather than attending to inclusion as an afterthought, or not at all. We recognize and appreciate that intentionally designing for inclusion is complex and layered. For example, the answer to the question, What does it mean to “be included?” is neither simple nor straightforward. One of the primary ways that we define inclusion is through exclusion — if you are not in, you are out. By definition, then, can we ever include everyone? Moving beyond the binary of inclusion and exclusion, Mitchell (2019) challenges us to recognize inclusion as a multifaceted, never-complete process. In doing so, we look to a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2056-4880
DOI
10.1108/IJILT-06-2020-137
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the call for proposals for this special issue, we noted that inclusive teaching, inclusive pedagogy and inclusive education provide theoretical and practical guidance that can be used to intentionally design learning experiences that work to reduce educational inequity experienced by students who are marginalized based on their race, gender, socioeconomic status, ability status and other identity markers. As Gannon (2017) suggests, inclusive pedagogy is “a realization that traditional pedagogical methods — traditionally applied — have not served all of our students well” (para 13). Such realization should prompt educators to explore intentional pedagogies and designs that foreground inclusion, rather than attending to inclusion as an afterthought, or not at all. We recognize and appreciate that intentionally designing for inclusion is complex and layered. For example, the answer to the question, What does it mean to “be included?” is neither simple nor straightforward. One of the primary ways that we define inclusion is through exclusion — if you are not in, you are out. By definition, then, can we ever include everyone? Moving beyond the binary of inclusion and exclusion, Mitchell (2019) challenges us to recognize inclusion as a multifaceted, never-complete process. In doing so, we look to a

Journal

The International Journal of Information and Learning TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 12, 2020

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