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German Radio Equipment

German Radio Equipment III.TYPE FuG 16 Summary THE equipment consists of a communication transmitter and receiver operating on a frequency spectrum from 42.2 Mcs to MS. 39cs. Telephony is used. The pilot's intercommunication control box bears the designation B.Z.B. which is taken to be the abbreviation for Bord zu Bord Aircraft to Aircraft. The transmitter, receiver and motor generator are located inside the fuselage on the starboard wall just aft of the D.F. receiver. The tuning controls are not accessible in flight. There is no provision for the fitting of remote tuning controls. The equipment must, therefore, be used on one channel only, preset on the ground. The tuning dials of both transmitter and receiver are fitted with a click stop mechanism for tuning to four predetermined frequencies. This indicates that the equipment is also used, or may be used, in an installation which is fully accessible to the operator. The tuning dials of both transmitter and receiver have the frequency of 392 megacycles specially engraved in red. The other calibrations are in black. The pilot controls the operation of the equipment. A control lead is provided at the navigator's position, but is turned back and taped off. The wireless operator's panel carries switches Heaters on and Motor Generator on only. The installation is carried out in a permanent fashion and is well planned. There is no indication that it was introduced as an afterthought. The construction of the apparatus follows the usual German technique. In this case, however, the transmitter, receiver and associated circuits are in a single unit. Previous German apparatus has been built with transmitter and receiver in separate units. The ganged variable condensers in both transmitter and receiver are much smaller than those used in other German apparatus. The attendant economy in space probably permits the increased compactness of the unit described. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

German Radio Equipment

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 14 (8): 5 – Aug 1, 1942

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030932
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

III.TYPE FuG 16 Summary THE equipment consists of a communication transmitter and receiver operating on a frequency spectrum from 42.2 Mcs to MS. 39cs. Telephony is used. The pilot's intercommunication control box bears the designation B.Z.B. which is taken to be the abbreviation for Bord zu Bord Aircraft to Aircraft. The transmitter, receiver and motor generator are located inside the fuselage on the starboard wall just aft of the D.F. receiver. The tuning controls are not accessible in flight. There is no provision for the fitting of remote tuning controls. The equipment must, therefore, be used on one channel only, preset on the ground. The tuning dials of both transmitter and receiver are fitted with a click stop mechanism for tuning to four predetermined frequencies. This indicates that the equipment is also used, or may be used, in an installation which is fully accessible to the operator. The tuning dials of both transmitter and receiver have the frequency of 392 megacycles specially engraved in red. The other calibrations are in black. The pilot controls the operation of the equipment. A control lead is provided at the navigator's position, but is turned back and taped off. The wireless operator's panel carries switches Heaters on and Motor Generator on only. The installation is carried out in a permanent fashion and is well planned. There is no indication that it was introduced as an afterthought. The construction of the apparatus follows the usual German technique. In this case, however, the transmitter, receiver and associated circuits are in a single unit. Previous German apparatus has been built with transmitter and receiver in separate units. The ganged variable condensers in both transmitter and receiver are much smaller than those used in other German apparatus. The attendant economy in space probably permits the increased compactness of the unit described.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 1942

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