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Gender‐based stereotypes in the workplace: the case of Greece

Gender‐based stereotypes in the workplace: the case of Greece Purpose – Organizations need to address stereotypical bias in order to ensure that they do not underutilize any segment of the talent pool, and scarce managerial skills are effectively deployed. To this aim, research on gender stereotypes would provide valuable information to corporate leaders. Given the dearth of empirical research on this issue for the case of Greece, the current study was designed to explore the relationship between attitudes toward women as managers and gender‐based stereotypes. Design/methodology/approach – A survey was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Participants in the survey were 173 full‐time employees working for firms across all the sectors of the economy. Findings – The main findings indicate that the primary source of shaping respondents’ attitudes is their own gender. Other personal characteristics such as age, education, managerial experience, and working under a female supervisor seem not to have a measurable effect on employees’ stereotypic attitudes toward women in management. Furthermore, organizational characteristics such as the firm's nationality, ownership, sector, or department do not seem to provide any source of variance in employees’ attitudes. Research limitations/implications – Further research to extend the current investigation to employers and managers would allow for a more articulated discussion of the main sources of influence on stereotypical attitudes toward women in management. Originality/value – Given the scarcity of empirical research on stereotyping and women's career prospects in Greece, this study contributes to debates in the wider academic community on the issue of analysing empirically stereotypic attitudes toward women as managers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Equal Opportunities International Emerald Publishing

Gender‐based stereotypes in the workplace: the case of Greece

Equal Opportunities International , Volume 25 (5): 16 – Jul 1, 2006

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0261-0159
DOI
10.1108/02610150610706708
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Organizations need to address stereotypical bias in order to ensure that they do not underutilize any segment of the talent pool, and scarce managerial skills are effectively deployed. To this aim, research on gender stereotypes would provide valuable information to corporate leaders. Given the dearth of empirical research on this issue for the case of Greece, the current study was designed to explore the relationship between attitudes toward women as managers and gender‐based stereotypes. Design/methodology/approach – A survey was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Participants in the survey were 173 full‐time employees working for firms across all the sectors of the economy. Findings – The main findings indicate that the primary source of shaping respondents’ attitudes is their own gender. Other personal characteristics such as age, education, managerial experience, and working under a female supervisor seem not to have a measurable effect on employees’ stereotypic attitudes toward women in management. Furthermore, organizational characteristics such as the firm's nationality, ownership, sector, or department do not seem to provide any source of variance in employees’ attitudes. Research limitations/implications – Further research to extend the current investigation to employers and managers would allow for a more articulated discussion of the main sources of influence on stereotypical attitudes toward women in management. Originality/value – Given the scarcity of empirical research on stereotyping and women's career prospects in Greece, this study contributes to debates in the wider academic community on the issue of analysing empirically stereotypic attitudes toward women as managers.

Journal

Equal Opportunities InternationalEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 2006

Keywords: Managers; Gender; Sexual discrimination; Greece; Women; Workplace

References

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