From neuromorphic sensors to a chip under skin Morality and ethics in the world of the internet of things

From neuromorphic sensors to a chip under skin Morality and ethics in the world of the internet... Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explain the sense of choice in our contemporary world. Design/methodology/approach – Taking cue from the research of the Institute of Neuroinformatics of Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, and University of Zürich, this paper is meant to highlight that the contemporary individual is gradually abandoning his own freedom of choice: the principle of moral responsibility, and – consequently – sign of humanity. Findings – If today the smartphone is the most used tool, in the future we will soon benefit from a chip under skin which could delegate our choices. It is a piece of technology that is not only inspired by biology to create robots, but could also change our life. Originality/value – From the massive use of the cell phone to the robots which apparently ‘‘feel’’ and show emotions like humans do. From the wearable exoskeleton to the prototype reproducing the artificial sense of touch, technological progress explodes to the extent of embodying itself in our nakedness. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society Emerald Publishing

From neuromorphic sensors to a chip under skin Morality and ethics in the world of the internet of things

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1477-996X
DOI
10.1108/JICES-12-2012-0023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explain the sense of choice in our contemporary world. Design/methodology/approach – Taking cue from the research of the Institute of Neuroinformatics of Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, and University of Zürich, this paper is meant to highlight that the contemporary individual is gradually abandoning his own freedom of choice: the principle of moral responsibility, and – consequently – sign of humanity. Findings – If today the smartphone is the most used tool, in the future we will soon benefit from a chip under skin which could delegate our choices. It is a piece of technology that is not only inspired by biology to create robots, but could also change our life. Originality/value – From the massive use of the cell phone to the robots which apparently ‘‘feel’’ and show emotions like humans do. From the wearable exoskeleton to the prototype reproducing the artificial sense of touch, technological progress explodes to the extent of embodying itself in our nakedness.

Journal

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in SocietyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 17, 2013

Keywords: Artificial life; Ethics; Moral responsibility; Philosophy; Social responsibility; Internet

References

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