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From Learning to Practical Use and Visible Results A Case in Competence Development from a Norwegian Business Firm

From Learning to Practical Use and Visible Results A Case in Competence Development from a... Measuring the results of competence development on business results seems to be a complicated and almost insuperable step for many businesses. International research presents us with a huge material showing the relevance and validity of the different ways of measuring effects from competence development on organisational outcome. Yet, it seems as though the practitioner relies on an accidental positive outcome more than on a planned and guided learning process where the economic results of the training are measurable. In this case from a Norwegian business firm, I adopt a method of approach that may help organisations to develop their competence through calculating the financial return on their investments in competence development. There seems to be a great potential for higher earnings from competence investments and more reliable measurements of results if the practitioners are willing and able to use some suitable and relatively simple methods. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting Emerald Publishing

From Learning to Practical Use and Visible Results A Case in Competence Development from a Norwegian Business Firm

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1401-338X
DOI
10.1108/eb029065
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Measuring the results of competence development on business results seems to be a complicated and almost insuperable step for many businesses. International research presents us with a huge material showing the relevance and validity of the different ways of measuring effects from competence development on organisational outcome. Yet, it seems as though the practitioner relies on an accidental positive outcome more than on a planned and guided learning process where the economic results of the training are measurable. In this case from a Norwegian business firm, I adopt a method of approach that may help organisations to develop their competence through calculating the financial return on their investments in competence development. There seems to be a great potential for higher earnings from competence investments and more reliable measurements of results if the practitioners are willing and able to use some suitable and relatively simple methods.

Journal

Journal of Human Resource Costing & AccountingEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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