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French Commercial Planes

French Commercial Planes March, 1929 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING 5 Ne w Designs from Several Firms show Evidence of America n Influence on Characteristics A VERY interesting development in lage is of box-girder construction, covered in fuselage ; from this point to the tip they are French aeroplane construction, three-ply, and provides an exceptionally covered with three-ply. The wings are signs of which were apparent at the well-lighted and airy cabin, noticeably free mounted on ball-and-socket joints, so that Berlin show, is the appearance from the from noise. As I have found for myself the alignment of the wing can be changed in workshops of firms, hitherto specialising on in a test flight, the machine gets off the accordance with variations in the load or type widely different lines, of commercial machines ground easily, has a low landing speed and of motor fitted. The pilots' compartment with a common characteristic: the American also a very low minimum flying speed, being has two scats with a doorway through to the "formula " of a 4- or 5-seater monoplane with a 200-300-h.p. motor. The Potez, Nieuport-Delage, Avimeta, Farman and Bleriot firms, though all producing machines of this same general type have each set about it on different lines. The Potez 32, which was the precursor of the type in France, is already too well known to need description, while the all-metal Avimeta can be ignored, since this firm has given up aircraft con­ struction. It is not surprising that the Nieuport- Delage 640 should recall in its construction the well-known Albert monoplane, since M. Duhamcl is responsible for the design of both. The one-piece wing is constructed entirely of wood, being covered with three- ply over a skeleton of built-up ribs, spaced 2 ft. apart, and spruce stringers, in place of spars, of which four of greater depth act able to remain in flight with the motor four-passenger cabin. Its roof above the as attachment s to the fuselage. The fuselage, running at considerably reduced power. pilot is fitted to slide so that it can be also of wood, is constructed in three sections: The engine at present fitted is a 230-240 h.p. converted into an open cockpit if desired. the front carrying the engine bearers; the Gnome-Le Rhone-Bristol "Titan, " but this The passenger seats are convertible into- centre portion comprising the two-seater is to be replaced by a nine-cylinder 240-h.p. sleeping berths. There is a lavatory and pilots' compartment, cabin, and luggage air-cooled Farman, now undergoing tests. luggage compartment in the tail. The petrol compartment ; and the tail supporting the The machine has just been put into service tank is mounted between the prolongation empennage. The cabin measures 1·95 m. on the Paris-Brussels-Amsterdam route. of the wing-roots in the fuselage, and has a by 1·3 m. by 1·14 m., and is normally quick-release opening in the bottom, so that Characteristics: span, 14 m. (46 ft.); entered by a door on the left, though another the fuel can be jettisoned in flight. The wing length, 10 m. (32 ft. 10 ins.); height, long door is provided on the right-hand side strut on each side is anchored at the bottoir 4 m. (13 ft.); wing area, 39 sq. m. for use when the machine is used as an to a cross-bracing member connecting the V- (420 sq. ft.). ambulance plane, for which purpose it is shaped undercarriage struts, between which Weight, empty, 925 kg. (2,035 lbs.). also designed to serve. It is interesting to are a pair of Bleriot patented spring wheels. Fuel, 275 kg. (605 lbs.). note that this machine, on the day after its Useful load, 480 kg. (1,056 lbs.). Characteristics: span, 16 m. (52 ft. 6 ins.); first flight, flew from Paris to Berlin. The Weight, loaded, 1,680 kg. (3,691 lbs.). length, 10·9 m. (29ft. 6 ins.); height, main characteristics of the machine arc as The Bleriot 111 (which is still undergoing 3·385 m. (11 ft.); wing area, 34 sq. m. follows :— (367 sq. ft.). trials), unlike the others, is a low-wing Span, 15·4 m. (50 ft. 7 in.) ; length, monoplane. The semi-thick wing is stayed Weight, empty, 1,200 kg. (2,640 lbs.). 9·4 5 m. (29 ft. 4 ins.) ; height, 3·19 m. by a Y-shaped strut on each side. Up to Fuel, 500 kg. (1,100 lbs.). (10 ft. 6 in.) ; wing area, 30 sq. m. the point of attachment of the strut, the Useful load, 495 kg. (1,089 lbs.). (334 sq. ft.). wings are "stubs " built integral with the Weight, loaded, 2,200 kg. (4,480 lbs.). Weight, empty, 1,050 kg. (2,310 lbs.). Fuel, 200 kg. (440 lbs.). Useful load, 500 kg. (1,100 lbs.). SPANISH AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY area of 76,000 square metres, comprise 1,650 machines, and employ 4,100 workers, all Spanish, Spain now possesses four aircraft factories : Weight, loaded, 1,750 kg. (3,850 lbs.). and not counting the personnel employed by (1) The Hispano Company, with works and The first machine is fitted with a Wright the Hispano Suiza Company for car building. aerodrome at Guadalajara; "Whirlwind " engine, but the type can be The capital of the companies amounts to over (2) The Construcciones Aeronauticas Com­ adapted to take either Lorraine, Salmson, or pany (C.A.S.A.), with all-metal landplane 31 million pesetas (£1,062,008) and the annual Armstrong-Siddeley engines of similar power. factory at Getafe; output with continuous activity would be 600 aircraft and 900 engines. This figure has un­ (3) All-metal seaplane factory at Cadiz; The Farman 190, though of the same class, fortunately not yet been reached, owing to (4) The Loring Company, with works and is of distinct construction on the normal the absence of a proper programme of construc­ aerodrome at Carabanchal Alto. wood and fabric lines familiar in the products tion. Mention must also be made of factories, The principal engine manufacturers are the of this firm. The wing lies on top of the such as the Sociedad de Construccion Naval, Hispano Suiza and Elizalde Companies, and the which turns out the raw materials required, principal manufacturer of accessories such as fuselage, and has four inclined struts of such as steels, while the production of alumi­ magnetos, navigating instruments, radiators, duralumin with wooden fairings. The fuse- nium has now been begun in the Pyrenees, etc., is Sanchez Quinoñes. All these firms are thanks to the measures for the protection of national concerns in the strictest sense of the * From AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING'S Special Cor­ industry recently introduced. word. Spain's seven factories cover a total respondent in France. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

French Commercial Planes

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 1 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1929

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029088
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

March, 1929 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING 5 Ne w Designs from Several Firms show Evidence of America n Influence on Characteristics A VERY interesting development in lage is of box-girder construction, covered in fuselage ; from this point to the tip they are French aeroplane construction, three-ply, and provides an exceptionally covered with three-ply. The wings are signs of which were apparent at the well-lighted and airy cabin, noticeably free mounted on ball-and-socket joints, so that Berlin show, is the appearance from the from noise. As I have found for myself the alignment of the wing can be changed in workshops of firms, hitherto specialising on in a test flight, the machine gets off the accordance with variations in the load or type widely different lines, of commercial machines ground easily, has a low landing speed and of motor fitted. The pilots' compartment with a common characteristic: the American also a very low minimum flying speed, being has two scats with a doorway through to the "formula " of a 4- or 5-seater monoplane with a 200-300-h.p. motor. The Potez, Nieuport-Delage, Avimeta, Farman and Bleriot firms, though all producing machines of this same general type have each set about it on different lines. The Potez 32, which was the precursor of the type in France, is already too well known to need description, while the all-metal Avimeta can be ignored, since this firm has given up aircraft con­ struction. It is not surprising that the Nieuport- Delage 640 should recall in its construction the well-known Albert monoplane, since M. Duhamcl is responsible for the design of both. The one-piece wing is constructed entirely of wood, being covered with three- ply over a skeleton of built-up ribs, spaced 2 ft. apart, and spruce stringers, in place of spars, of which four of greater depth act able to remain in flight with the motor four-passenger cabin. Its roof above the as attachment s to the fuselage. The fuselage, running at considerably reduced power. pilot is fitted to slide so that it can be also of wood, is constructed in three sections: The engine at present fitted is a 230-240 h.p. converted into an open cockpit if desired. the front carrying the engine bearers; the Gnome-Le Rhone-Bristol "Titan, " but this The passenger seats are convertible into- centre portion comprising the two-seater is to be replaced by a nine-cylinder 240-h.p. sleeping berths. There is a lavatory and pilots' compartment, cabin, and luggage air-cooled Farman, now undergoing tests. luggage compartment in the tail. The petrol compartment ; and the tail supporting the The machine has just been put into service tank is mounted between the prolongation empennage. The cabin measures 1·95 m. on the Paris-Brussels-Amsterdam route. of the wing-roots in the fuselage, and has a by 1·3 m. by 1·14 m., and is normally quick-release opening in the bottom, so that Characteristics: span, 14 m. (46 ft.); entered by a door on the left, though another the fuel can be jettisoned in flight. The wing length, 10 m. (32 ft. 10 ins.); height, long door is provided on the right-hand side strut on each side is anchored at the bottoir 4 m. (13 ft.); wing area, 39 sq. m. for use when the machine is used as an to a cross-bracing member connecting the V- (420 sq. ft.). ambulance plane, for which purpose it is shaped undercarriage struts, between which Weight, empty, 925 kg. (2,035 lbs.). also designed to serve. It is interesting to are a pair of Bleriot patented spring wheels. Fuel, 275 kg. (605 lbs.). note that this machine, on the day after its Useful load, 480 kg. (1,056 lbs.). Characteristics: span, 16 m. (52 ft. 6 ins.); first flight, flew from Paris to Berlin. The Weight, loaded, 1,680 kg. (3,691 lbs.). length, 10·9 m. (29ft. 6 ins.); height, main characteristics of the machine arc as The Bleriot 111 (which is still undergoing 3·385 m. (11 ft.); wing area, 34 sq. m. follows :— (367 sq. ft.). trials), unlike the others, is a low-wing Span, 15·4 m. (50 ft. 7 in.) ; length, monoplane. The semi-thick wing is stayed Weight, empty, 1,200 kg. (2,640 lbs.). 9·4 5 m. (29 ft. 4 ins.) ; height, 3·19 m. by a Y-shaped strut on each side. Up to Fuel, 500 kg. (1,100 lbs.). (10 ft. 6 in.) ; wing area, 30 sq. m. the point of attachment of the strut, the Useful load, 495 kg. (1,089 lbs.). (334 sq. ft.). wings are "stubs " built integral with the Weight, loaded, 2,200 kg. (4,480 lbs.). Weight, empty, 1,050 kg. (2,310 lbs.). Fuel, 200 kg. (440 lbs.). Useful load, 500 kg. (1,100 lbs.). SPANISH AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY area of 76,000 square metres, comprise 1,650 machines, and employ 4,100 workers, all Spanish, Spain now possesses four aircraft factories : Weight, loaded, 1,750 kg. (3,850 lbs.). and not counting the personnel employed by (1) The Hispano Company, with works and The first machine is fitted with a Wright the Hispano Suiza Company for car building. aerodrome at Guadalajara; "Whirlwind " engine, but the type can be The capital of the companies amounts to over (2) The Construcciones Aeronauticas Com­ adapted to take either Lorraine, Salmson, or pany (C.A.S.A.), with all-metal landplane 31 million pesetas (£1,062,008) and the annual Armstrong-Siddeley engines of similar power. factory at Getafe; output with continuous activity would be 600 aircraft and 900 engines. This figure has un­ (3) All-metal seaplane factory at Cadiz; The Farman 190, though of the same class, fortunately not yet been reached, owing to (4) The Loring Company, with works and is of distinct construction on the normal the absence of a proper programme of construc­ aerodrome at Carabanchal Alto. wood and fabric lines familiar in the products tion. Mention must also be made of factories, The principal engine manufacturers are the of this firm. The wing lies on top of the such as the Sociedad de Construccion Naval, Hispano Suiza and Elizalde Companies, and the which turns out the raw materials required, principal manufacturer of accessories such as fuselage, and has four inclined struts of such as steels, while the production of alumi­ magnetos, navigating instruments, radiators, duralumin with wooden fairings. The fuse- nium has now been begun in the Pyrenees, etc., is Sanchez Quinoñes. All these firms are thanks to the measures for the protection of national concerns in the strictest sense of the * From AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING'S Special Cor­ industry recently introduced. word. Spain's seven factories cover a total respondent in France.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1929

There are no references for this article.