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Frederick W. Taylor, J. Maunsell White III, and the Matthew Effect The rest of the story

Frederick W. Taylor, J. Maunsell White III, and the Matthew Effect The rest of the story In an effort to give credit where credit is due, recounts J. Maunsell White III’s role in the development of the Taylor‐White process for treating tool steel. A contemporary and colleague of Frederick W. Taylor, “The Father of Scientific Management”, White offers a classic example of the so‐called Matthew Effect, in which recognition accrues to those of considerable repute and is withheld from those who have not yet made their mark. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Management History (Archive) Emerald Publishing

Frederick W. Taylor, J. Maunsell White III, and the Matthew Effect The rest of the story

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1355-252X
DOI
10.1108/13552529610106842
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In an effort to give credit where credit is due, recounts J. Maunsell White III’s role in the development of the Taylor‐White process for treating tool steel. A contemporary and colleague of Frederick W. Taylor, “The Father of Scientific Management”, White offers a classic example of the so‐called Matthew Effect, in which recognition accrues to those of considerable repute and is withheld from those who have not yet made their mark.

Journal

Journal of Management History (Archive)Emerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1996

Keywords: Business history; Machine tools; Management; Steel; Steel industry

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