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France Resurgent

France Resurgent Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXI No 242 APRIL 1949 backed, as they are, by years of fine tradition we do not doubt that some of them will soon emerge from the chrysalis stage and recall the URING the last two years we have devoted considerable glories of the past. space in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING to various aspects of French aeronautical activities in a number of articles written by our Future Promise Technical Editor. In 1947 he followed his survey of the Seventeenth Paris Salon by a description of the Arsenal VB-10 CI as a preliminary It is perhaps natural, though regrettable, that up to the present the post-war French industry has shown a tendency to dissipate its ener­ to a full account, in June, of the interesting and varied work at that time proceeding at the French Government Establishment at gies over too many prototypes, but it seems that the lesson is begin­ Chatillon-sous-Bagneux. Then, in July and August, we published a ning to be learnt and the inevitable pruning process is now beginning detailed examination of the production methods in use at the Paris, which will lead to concentration on a few of the more promising'. Here Toulouse and Marignane factories of AEROSUDEST where examples again, other countries have gone through the same phase and learnt that, with aeroplanes as with nations, it is only the fittest that survive. of the SE-2010, four-engined, seventy-ton air-liner were being built. During last year, M R STEVENS continued his series of articles on the Where France already shows a praiseworthy indication of solid post-war products of the French aircraft industry with, in April, a achievement is in the design of light aeroplanes—such as the Nord brief description of the unconventional AEROCENTRE NC-1070 ship- Norecrin, fully described elsewhere in this issue—which, with the not­ plane and, in July, a full account of the interesting structural features able French enthusiasm for flying—so sadly lacking in England in these days—is a promising and economically sound line of thought. of the AEROSUDEST photographic survey SE-1010, which was later Supplemented, in December, by some further illustrations and details In the somewhat analogous department of gliders and high-perform­ of this aeroplane. ance sailplanes very remarkable success has already been attained. Bearing in mind the beginnings from which the German Air Force of 1939 sprang, this is perhaps the most hopeful portent of the coming The French Industry greatness, which we are sure is on the way, of the French Aircraft As a foretaste of the Eighteenth Salon at the end of this month, Industry—to all the members of whom we wish to offer our saluta­ and in some sort a culmination of the series we have been publishing, tions and best wishes. we invited M. ANDRE CHARRIOU, who will be remembered for his critical description of the S.B.A.C. Display in our columns last Transatlantic Contributions autumn, to write for this issue his appreciation of the present position In dealing with the other contents of this issue we would give pride of the French Aircraft Industry which appears on a later page. He of place to the American paper read at last summer's INTERNATIONAL well brings out the tragic state to which it was brought under the CONGRESS OF APPLIED MECHANICS on a new and simplified method occupation and, in his survey of the types which are in course of de­ of recording the hydrodynamic characteristics of flying-boats. We are velopment, shows what courageous attempts are being made to shake greatly indebted to the author, our good friend MR F. W. S. LOCKE, off the shackles of the war years and rehabilitate an industry which JR. , for giving AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING the opportunity of presenting occupied so high a position in world aviation in happier times. As this most interesting paper which will not be appearing elsewhere as, our Technical Editor recalled two years ago, when France had to suc­ we understand, it is not the policy of the Congress to duplicate pub­ cumb to the overwhelming force brought against her in 1940, some of lication in its own Report of papers which have appeared elsewhere. the best French fighters of that period—such as, notably, the Another contribution from the U.S.A. that appears in this issue is Dewoitine D-520 which emanated from a nationalized company, the concluding instalment of DR KLEMIN'S absorbingly interesting AEROSUDEST, which incorporated, among others, the old Dewoitine firm—were just beginning to come out of the factories for the equip­ summary of the proceedings at the recent annual meeting of the ment (alas, too late) of the French Army Air Service. So far as their INSTITUTE OF THE AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES. design was concerned, these fighters were worthy successors of the A Widely-Cast Net famous Spads and Moranes of the Four Years' War and were at least the equals of their German 'opposite numbers' such as the Me 109. With the British contributions in this issue on rivet flexibility and All development of aeroplanes of this class was inevitably stopped its effect on load diffusion problems, strength of jacks, weight restric­ for five years. We in England, with our difficulties in evolving satis­ tion and the note on the solution of single simultaneous equations, factory post-war types of civil air-liners, know how long it takes to we can not only claim that the interest is well spread but that, drawing produce new aeroplanes, starting afresh from the beginning, and are as we do on both the Old World and the New we are well maintaining not, therefore, surprised that the modern French fighters listed by our claim to provide a medium for the publication of the work of the M. CHARRIOU have hardly yet got beyond the project stage. But aeronautical profession in all countries. THE XVIITH PARIS SALON, APRIL 29—MAY 15 We invite our readers to visit us at STAND No. 7 in BALCONY E in the GRAND PALAIS where bound volumes of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING will be available for consultation, recent issues on sale and various booklets and pamphlets obtainable http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

France Resurgent

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 21 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1949

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031744
Publisher site
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Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXI No 242 APRIL 1949 backed, as they are, by years of fine tradition we do not doubt that some of them will soon emerge from the chrysalis stage and recall the URING the last two years we have devoted considerable glories of the past. space in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING to various aspects of French aeronautical activities in a number of articles written by our Future Promise Technical Editor. In 1947 he followed his survey of the Seventeenth Paris Salon by a description of the Arsenal VB-10 CI as a preliminary It is perhaps natural, though regrettable, that up to the present the post-war French industry has shown a tendency to dissipate its ener­ to a full account, in June, of the interesting and varied work at that time proceeding at the French Government Establishment at gies over too many prototypes, but it seems that the lesson is begin­ Chatillon-sous-Bagneux. Then, in July and August, we published a ning to be learnt and the inevitable pruning process is now beginning detailed examination of the production methods in use at the Paris, which will lead to concentration on a few of the more promising'. Here Toulouse and Marignane factories of AEROSUDEST where examples again, other countries have gone through the same phase and learnt that, with aeroplanes as with nations, it is only the fittest that survive. of the SE-2010, four-engined, seventy-ton air-liner were being built. During last year, M R STEVENS continued his series of articles on the Where France already shows a praiseworthy indication of solid post-war products of the French aircraft industry with, in April, a achievement is in the design of light aeroplanes—such as the Nord brief description of the unconventional AEROCENTRE NC-1070 ship- Norecrin, fully described elsewhere in this issue—which, with the not­ plane and, in July, a full account of the interesting structural features able French enthusiasm for flying—so sadly lacking in England in these days—is a promising and economically sound line of thought. of the AEROSUDEST photographic survey SE-1010, which was later Supplemented, in December, by some further illustrations and details In the somewhat analogous department of gliders and high-perform­ of this aeroplane. ance sailplanes very remarkable success has already been attained. Bearing in mind the beginnings from which the German Air Force of 1939 sprang, this is perhaps the most hopeful portent of the coming The French Industry greatness, which we are sure is on the way, of the French Aircraft As a foretaste of the Eighteenth Salon at the end of this month, Industry—to all the members of whom we wish to offer our saluta­ and in some sort a culmination of the series we have been publishing, tions and best wishes. we invited M. ANDRE CHARRIOU, who will be remembered for his critical description of the S.B.A.C. Display in our columns last Transatlantic Contributions autumn, to write for this issue his appreciation of the present position In dealing with the other contents of this issue we would give pride of the French Aircraft Industry which appears on a later page. He of place to the American paper read at last summer's INTERNATIONAL well brings out the tragic state to which it was brought under the CONGRESS OF APPLIED MECHANICS on a new and simplified method occupation and, in his survey of the types which are in course of de­ of recording the hydrodynamic characteristics of flying-boats. We are velopment, shows what courageous attempts are being made to shake greatly indebted to the author, our good friend MR F. W. S. LOCKE, off the shackles of the war years and rehabilitate an industry which JR. , for giving AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING the opportunity of presenting occupied so high a position in world aviation in happier times. As this most interesting paper which will not be appearing elsewhere as, our Technical Editor recalled two years ago, when France had to suc­ we understand, it is not the policy of the Congress to duplicate pub­ cumb to the overwhelming force brought against her in 1940, some of lication in its own Report of papers which have appeared elsewhere. the best French fighters of that period—such as, notably, the Another contribution from the U.S.A. that appears in this issue is Dewoitine D-520 which emanated from a nationalized company, the concluding instalment of DR KLEMIN'S absorbingly interesting AEROSUDEST, which incorporated, among others, the old Dewoitine firm—were just beginning to come out of the factories for the equip­ summary of the proceedings at the recent annual meeting of the ment (alas, too late) of the French Army Air Service. So far as their INSTITUTE OF THE AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES. design was concerned, these fighters were worthy successors of the A Widely-Cast Net famous Spads and Moranes of the Four Years' War and were at least the equals of their German 'opposite numbers' such as the Me 109. With the British contributions in this issue on rivet flexibility and All development of aeroplanes of this class was inevitably stopped its effect on load diffusion problems, strength of jacks, weight restric­ for five years. We in England, with our difficulties in evolving satis­ tion and the note on the solution of single simultaneous equations, factory post-war types of civil air-liners, know how long it takes to we can not only claim that the interest is well spread but that, drawing produce new aeroplanes, starting afresh from the beginning, and are as we do on both the Old World and the New we are well maintaining not, therefore, surprised that the modern French fighters listed by our claim to provide a medium for the publication of the work of the M. CHARRIOU have hardly yet got beyond the project stage. But aeronautical profession in all countries. THE XVIITH PARIS SALON, APRIL 29—MAY 15 We invite our readers to visit us at STAND No. 7 in BALCONY E in the GRAND PALAIS where bound volumes of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING will be available for consultation, recent issues on sale and various booklets and pamphlets obtainable

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1949

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