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FOOD ALLERGY

FOOD ALLERGY Current interest centres round this problem which may be more widespread than previously thought The realisation that certain foods can produce abnormal reactions in susceptible individuals dates back to ancient times. Nowadays, while much research is being done into the long-term effects of diet on the causation of such conditions as arteriosclerosis and cancer, the short term ill effects of diet in susceptible individuals has received comparatively little attention. A useful contemporary review of the diversity and treatment of foo d allergy, however, has been published in the Lancet (1979).1 The reviewer distinguishes the classical immunological food reactions fro m non-immunological reactions. The first type include oedema and urticaria (nettle rash) produced by such foods as strawberries, shellfish and eggs, about 10% of the population, can be is not known whether such regimes and the gastrointestinal symptoms reduce the incidence of childhood triggered by foods which contain characteristic of gluten intolerance. asthma, whic h often follows monoamines. The second type are probably due infantile eczema. Food allergies are The reviewer concludes that food to genetically determined enzyme said to be responsible for 25% of intolerance can produce a wid e deficiencies. It is suggested that the childhood asthma, and can also range of symptoms in susceptible term 'food allergy' be restricted to play a part in adult asthma. A individuals. Recognition and immunological reactions of the first number of foo d constituents or elimation of offending foods from type and 'food intolerance' used to additives have been shown to the diet can lead to successful include both types of abnormal produce allergy or some other control. reactions t o food. allergic response, and the review Another aspect of foo d allergy Allergy is the clinical syndrome lists some of these. discussed in more recent resulting fro m sensitisation to correspondence (C. Hawkins, In the diagnosis of foo d allergy, protein antigens in the diet that trial withdrawa l of the suspected Lancet 1,1979, p. 1137), is the have been absorbed fro m the allergen is recommended as possibility that some 'allergies' are gastrointestinal tract, stimulating probably the best approach. Skin in the mind . In such instances the the formatio n of antibodies. testing is though t to have little withdrawal test can appear to be Subsequent exposure to the food positive. For confirmation, the value. may produce immediate symptoms suspected foods should be given A common non-immunological of hypersensitivity, and the without the patient's knowledge in food reaction is that produced by offending foo d can be avoided. order to test whether they provoke caffeine; symptoms include chronic Reactions are usually more subtle, symptoms. anxiety states, headache, cardiac however, and foo d allergens are and gastric disturbances. Caffeine often favourite foods which are sensitivity should be suspected eaten regularly. when such symptoms occur in an Reference: Allergy to cow's milk can cause a individual wit h a high caffeine 1 Leading article (1979). Food allergy. variety of symptoms, including intake. Migraine, whic h affects Lancet 1,249. rhinitis, eczema and asthma. This summary was taken, wit h permission, from the National Dairy Council's Nutritional Studies have show n that antigen Services Quarterly Review. This very helpful publication is produced by staff qualified in avoidance regimes, fo r example human nutrition and is available, free of charge, t o teachers, nutritionists, dietitians, doctors excluding milk, eggs and fish and and other health educators, and t o students of nutrition and dietetics. Those wh o woul d like substituting soya-bean milk, reduce to receive Quarterly Review regularly should writ e to The National Dairy Centre, Joh n Princes the incidence of infantile eczema. It Street, London W1 M 0AP November 1979 15 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition & Food Science Emerald Publishing

FOOD ALLERGY

Nutrition & Food Science , Volume 79 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1979

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0034-6659
DOI
10.1108/eb058777
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Current interest centres round this problem which may be more widespread than previously thought The realisation that certain foods can produce abnormal reactions in susceptible individuals dates back to ancient times. Nowadays, while much research is being done into the long-term effects of diet on the causation of such conditions as arteriosclerosis and cancer, the short term ill effects of diet in susceptible individuals has received comparatively little attention. A useful contemporary review of the diversity and treatment of foo d allergy, however, has been published in the Lancet (1979).1 The reviewer distinguishes the classical immunological food reactions fro m non-immunological reactions. The first type include oedema and urticaria (nettle rash) produced by such foods as strawberries, shellfish and eggs, about 10% of the population, can be is not known whether such regimes and the gastrointestinal symptoms reduce the incidence of childhood triggered by foods which contain characteristic of gluten intolerance. asthma, whic h often follows monoamines. The second type are probably due infantile eczema. Food allergies are The reviewer concludes that food to genetically determined enzyme said to be responsible for 25% of intolerance can produce a wid e deficiencies. It is suggested that the childhood asthma, and can also range of symptoms in susceptible term 'food allergy' be restricted to play a part in adult asthma. A individuals. Recognition and immunological reactions of the first number of foo d constituents or elimation of offending foods from type and 'food intolerance' used to additives have been shown to the diet can lead to successful include both types of abnormal produce allergy or some other control. reactions t o food. allergic response, and the review Another aspect of foo d allergy Allergy is the clinical syndrome lists some of these. discussed in more recent resulting fro m sensitisation to correspondence (C. Hawkins, In the diagnosis of foo d allergy, protein antigens in the diet that trial withdrawa l of the suspected Lancet 1,1979, p. 1137), is the have been absorbed fro m the allergen is recommended as possibility that some 'allergies' are gastrointestinal tract, stimulating probably the best approach. Skin in the mind . In such instances the the formatio n of antibodies. testing is though t to have little withdrawal test can appear to be Subsequent exposure to the food positive. For confirmation, the value. may produce immediate symptoms suspected foods should be given A common non-immunological of hypersensitivity, and the without the patient's knowledge in food reaction is that produced by offending foo d can be avoided. order to test whether they provoke caffeine; symptoms include chronic Reactions are usually more subtle, symptoms. anxiety states, headache, cardiac however, and foo d allergens are and gastric disturbances. Caffeine often favourite foods which are sensitivity should be suspected eaten regularly. when such symptoms occur in an Reference: Allergy to cow's milk can cause a individual wit h a high caffeine 1 Leading article (1979). Food allergy. variety of symptoms, including intake. Migraine, whic h affects Lancet 1,249. rhinitis, eczema and asthma. This summary was taken, wit h permission, from the National Dairy Council's Nutritional Studies have show n that antigen Services Quarterly Review. This very helpful publication is produced by staff qualified in avoidance regimes, fo r example human nutrition and is available, free of charge, t o teachers, nutritionists, dietitians, doctors excluding milk, eggs and fish and and other health educators, and t o students of nutrition and dietetics. Those wh o woul d like substituting soya-bean milk, reduce to receive Quarterly Review regularly should writ e to The National Dairy Centre, Joh n Princes the incidence of infantile eczema. It Street, London W1 M 0AP November 1979 15

Journal

Nutrition & Food ScienceEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1979

There are no references for this article.