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Food additives and children's behaviour: evidence‐based policy at the margins of certainty

Food additives and children's behaviour: evidence‐based policy at the margins of certainty The possible effects of food additives (specifically artificial colours) have been debated for over 30 years. The evidence accumulated suggests that for some children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) food colours exacerbate their condition. Two studies undertaken by a research group at the University of Southampton have extended these findings to the effects on hyperactivity in children from the general population who do not show ADHD. This article reviews the response from policy‐makers to these findings and concludes that the failure to impose a mandatory ban on the six food colours in the Southampton study is inadequate and that such a ban would be an appropriate application of the precautionary principle when the evidence is considered to be at the margins of certainty. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Children's Services Emerald Publishing

Food additives and children's behaviour: evidence‐based policy at the margins of certainty

Journal of Children's Services , Volume 4 (2): 10 – Oct 14, 2009

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1746-6660
DOI
10.1108/17466660200900008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The possible effects of food additives (specifically artificial colours) have been debated for over 30 years. The evidence accumulated suggests that for some children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) food colours exacerbate their condition. Two studies undertaken by a research group at the University of Southampton have extended these findings to the effects on hyperactivity in children from the general population who do not show ADHD. This article reviews the response from policy‐makers to these findings and concludes that the failure to impose a mandatory ban on the six food colours in the Southampton study is inadequate and that such a ban would be an appropriate application of the precautionary principle when the evidence is considered to be at the margins of certainty.

Journal

Journal of Children's ServicesEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 14, 2009

Keywords: Hyperactivity; Food additives; Precautionary principle; Evidence‐based policy

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