Floodlight on Metals

Floodlight on Metals Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION A Basic Subject Metallurgy is outstandingly a subject which in the past thirty CONSIDERABLE number of our home readers, at any years or so has made enormous strides, largely owing to the stimulus rate, no doubt attended the meetings at which the sym­ exerted by the rapid developments made during the period in posium of papers on high-temperature steels and alloys, aeronautics. In the years immediately after the first world war arranged by the IRON AND STEEL INSTITUTE, were read on February the turnover from wooden to all-metal aeroplanes was only made 21 and 22, and some of them will have taken advantage of the offer possible by the intensive efforts put by metallurgists into the search of subscribing in advance at a reduced price for the bound volume for higher quality steels and the then newly evolved aluminium which is to be issued containing the papers presented and the dis­ alloys. In this connexion, it is interesting to recall that in our second cussions thereon. The fact that this privileged subscription also issue—published in April 1929—we referred to the changeover from covered a set of advance proofs of the complete papers makes the wood to metal construction as a freshly-established fact. Since then amount asked, two guineas, one of the most remarkable bargains the call from the aircraft and aero-engine designer for ever new and ever, in our experience, offered and we cannot but congratulate the better metals has been unceasing and we think it is true to say that INSTITUTE on its generosity, which must inevitably involve it in without this incentive our knowledge of the structure and properties a heavy drain on its funds. of alloy steels and non-ferrous metals for special purposes would be very much less satisfactory than it is today. A Treasury The development of the gas-turbine engine, and jet engine in It is from a set of these advance proofs that we have taken the particular, a decade ago made fresh demands on the metallurgist summaries that are published on pp. 78 to 82 of this issue. The fact and nobly has he responded. Without his unceasing research and that these summaries, which are in every instance but the briefest brilliant inventiveness the modern gas-turbine would never have indication of the contents of the paper concerned, with a very few been possible; for the simple reason that at the beginning of the examples of the great number of illustrations included, cover rather period no materials existed that were capable of standing up for more than five of the large pages of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING gives any useful period to the intense heats and stresses involved. some idea of the enormous amount of information made available. Our Part We venture to predict that the full report when it appears will stand Thanks to the enterprise and initiative of the IRON AND STEEL as a textbook of the latest advances in metallurgy for many years to INSTITUTE the story of these remarkable, and indeed dramatic, de­ come. The final published price is to be £3 3s., which makes it velopments is at last told. We have long wished ourselves to publish stand out as value for money by comparison with the price inevit­ an article, or articles, on these modern materials, but no single peri­ ably charged by commercial publishers of modern technical books. odical could possibly have hoped to cover the ground in the manner that has now been so satisfactorily accomplished. It is with great A Permanent Investment pleasure, therefore, that we are doing what we can to enlarge the As a mine of instruction for the serious metallurgical student it circle of those who can become familiar with the fund of informa­ will be unrivalled and the copy which must be placed on the shelf of tion that is now available—in the first instance, by calling attention every University and Technical College library will assuredly be to it through publishing a complete series of summaries of the well thumbed. Indeed, we would advise every student who can papers contained in the symposium and, secondly, by making the possibly scrape the money together—even though, admittedly, it papers themselves available, in accordance with our offer, to those will be for him a large sum—to do so and buy a copy, which we are who it is so important should become familiar with them at the certain he will treasure as a prized possession to be repeatedly con­ outset of their careers. sulted during a large portion of his working life. An Interim Report An Offer The best way to deal with the preliminary report circulated by the CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY on the theoretical in­ Meanwhile, as our contribution to the wider dissemination of the priceless knowledge contained in these papers, we take this oppor­ vestigation into viscous effects in compressible fluids seemed to be tunity of announcing that we are prepared to lend a set of the to publish in full the Preface and Introduction so as to call the advance proofs, of which we have two copies, for a period not attention of those interested to it; rather than have it reviewed in our exceeding one week to any reader who has a current subscription normal way by an individual expert. This accordingly we have done. with us, at the reduced Special Rate for Students of £1 1s. We feel Those who wish to go further into the matter would be well that this is a direct further benefit we can confer on these young men. advised to write to the DURAND REPRINTING COMMITTEE, whose For obvious reasons we cannot extend the offer to other readers; address will be found at the head of the article on p. 83, who will who will, we hope, agree with us that students should come first. no doubt be glad to supply a copy. Nor can we go beyond the circle of those who are already known to This is the type of long-term fundamental investigation which us through their subscriptions; otherwise the number of applicants should in course of time throw fresh light on a matter which is of would, we fear, become uncontrollable. ever-increasing practical import. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Floodlight on Metals

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 23 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1951

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION A Basic Subject Metallurgy is outstandingly a subject which in the past thirty CONSIDERABLE number of our home readers, at any years or so has made enormous strides, largely owing to the stimulus rate, no doubt attended the meetings at which the sym­ exerted by the rapid developments made during the period in posium of papers on high-temperature steels and alloys, aeronautics. In the years immediately after the first world war arranged by the IRON AND STEEL INSTITUTE, were read on February the turnover from wooden to all-metal aeroplanes was only made 21 and 22, and some of them will have taken advantage of the offer possible by the intensive efforts put by metallurgists into the search of subscribing in advance at a reduced price for the bound volume for higher quality steels and the then newly evolved aluminium which is to be issued containing the papers presented and the dis­ alloys. In this connexion, it is interesting to recall that in our second cussions thereon. The fact that this privileged subscription also issue—published in April 1929—we referred to the changeover from covered a set of advance proofs of the complete papers makes the wood to metal construction as a freshly-established fact. Since then amount asked, two guineas, one of the most remarkable bargains the call from the aircraft and aero-engine designer for ever new and ever, in our experience, offered and we cannot but congratulate the better metals has been unceasing and we think it is true to say that INSTITUTE on its generosity, which must inevitably involve it in without this incentive our knowledge of the structure and properties a heavy drain on its funds. of alloy steels and non-ferrous metals for special purposes would be very much less satisfactory than it is today. A Treasury The development of the gas-turbine engine, and jet engine in It is from a set of these advance proofs that we have taken the particular, a decade ago made fresh demands on the metallurgist summaries that are published on pp. 78 to 82 of this issue. The fact and nobly has he responded. Without his unceasing research and that these summaries, which are in every instance but the briefest brilliant inventiveness the modern gas-turbine would never have indication of the contents of the paper concerned, with a very few been possible; for the simple reason that at the beginning of the examples of the great number of illustrations included, cover rather period no materials existed that were capable of standing up for more than five of the large pages of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING gives any useful period to the intense heats and stresses involved. some idea of the enormous amount of information made available. Our Part We venture to predict that the full report when it appears will stand Thanks to the enterprise and initiative of the IRON AND STEEL as a textbook of the latest advances in metallurgy for many years to INSTITUTE the story of these remarkable, and indeed dramatic, de­ come. The final published price is to be £3 3s., which makes it velopments is at last told. We have long wished ourselves to publish stand out as value for money by comparison with the price inevit­ an article, or articles, on these modern materials, but no single peri­ ably charged by commercial publishers of modern technical books. odical could possibly have hoped to cover the ground in the manner that has now been so satisfactorily accomplished. It is with great A Permanent Investment pleasure, therefore, that we are doing what we can to enlarge the As a mine of instruction for the serious metallurgical student it circle of those who can become familiar with the fund of informa­ will be unrivalled and the copy which must be placed on the shelf of tion that is now available—in the first instance, by calling attention every University and Technical College library will assuredly be to it through publishing a complete series of summaries of the well thumbed. Indeed, we would advise every student who can papers contained in the symposium and, secondly, by making the possibly scrape the money together—even though, admittedly, it papers themselves available, in accordance with our offer, to those will be for him a large sum—to do so and buy a copy, which we are who it is so important should become familiar with them at the certain he will treasure as a prized possession to be repeatedly con­ outset of their careers. sulted during a large portion of his working life. An Interim Report An Offer The best way to deal with the preliminary report circulated by the CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY on the theoretical in­ Meanwhile, as our contribution to the wider dissemination of the priceless knowledge contained in these papers, we take this oppor­ vestigation into viscous effects in compressible fluids seemed to be tunity of announcing that we are prepared to lend a set of the to publish in full the Preface and Introduction so as to call the advance proofs, of which we have two copies, for a period not attention of those interested to it; rather than have it reviewed in our exceeding one week to any reader who has a current subscription normal way by an individual expert. This accordingly we have done. with us, at the reduced Special Rate for Students of £1 1s. We feel Those who wish to go further into the matter would be well that this is a direct further benefit we can confer on these young men. advised to write to the DURAND REPRINTING COMMITTEE, whose For obvious reasons we cannot extend the offer to other readers; address will be found at the head of the article on p. 83, who will who will, we hope, agree with us that students should come first. no doubt be glad to supply a copy. Nor can we go beyond the circle of those who are already known to This is the type of long-term fundamental investigation which us through their subscriptions; otherwise the number of applicants should in course of time throw fresh light on a matter which is of would, we fear, become uncontrollable. ever-increasing practical import.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1951

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