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First to See the Light: EIT 40 Years of Higher Education

First to See the Light: EIT 40 Years of Higher Education Winchester, they problematize their positioning as part of the research methodology throughout. HER In drawing on a range of oral histories across the institution, from students to secretaries and 46,1 academic staff members, they pull together a series of perspectives on the campus experience across 60 years. None of the informants are identified by name and there are few photographs. The result is that this is not a traditional history of higher education but rather a different way of reflecting an institution’s past canvassed through the voices of former students who studied and often lived on campus as well as the voices of staff members. The detail gathered in the reported interview material is striking comprising mainly thoughtful and often critical reflections of experiences within the institution. It was most helpful to be able to refer to the initial questionnaire for the institution and wider community and to the draft document for interviewees included within the appendices. The authors also make clear just how they used data management systems to help collate the material collected. While all of this was admirable, what I really liked was the inclusion of examples of alumni voices at the beginning and at the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

First to See the Light: EIT 40 Years of Higher Education

History of Education Review , Volume 46 (1): 3 – Jun 5, 2017

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/HER-07-2016-0030
Publisher site
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Abstract

Winchester, they problematize their positioning as part of the research methodology throughout. HER In drawing on a range of oral histories across the institution, from students to secretaries and 46,1 academic staff members, they pull together a series of perspectives on the campus experience across 60 years. None of the informants are identified by name and there are few photographs. The result is that this is not a traditional history of higher education but rather a different way of reflecting an institution’s past canvassed through the voices of former students who studied and often lived on campus as well as the voices of staff members. The detail gathered in the reported interview material is striking comprising mainly thoughtful and often critical reflections of experiences within the institution. It was most helpful to be able to refer to the initial questionnaire for the institution and wider community and to the draft document for interviewees included within the appendices. The authors also make clear just how they used data management systems to help collate the material collected. While all of this was admirable, what I really liked was the inclusion of examples of alumni voices at the beginning and at the

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 5, 2017

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