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First-generation Ethiopian immigrants and beliefs about physical activity

First-generation Ethiopian immigrants and beliefs about physical activity While several studies have examined the attitudes, perceptions and beliefs of physical activity in different immigrant groups, little is known in this area among the first-generation Ethiopian immigrant population who lives in the USA. The purpose of this paper is to explore the behavioral, normative and control beliefs of physical activity among first-generation Ethiopian immigrants living in the DC-Metro area.Design/methodology/approachThe study used semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions and unobtrusive observation. Three structural themes and six textural themes were identified from the three forms of data collections. Qualitative data analysis including topics, categories and pattern analysis were conducted using phenomenological techniques.FindingsFindings highlighted similarities to the theory of planned behavior with regard to attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control. Consistent with the literature, several salient behavioral determinants of physical activity that could affect participants’ decision-making were identified in the current pilot study. Increased longevity, mental well-being, improved sleep and improved metabolism were listed as the most common benefits of physical activity. Lack of time, family responsibility, neighborhood safety, location of the gym, lack of awareness and social and economic stressors were the major barriers to engage in physical activity. Implications for service providers and future research are discussed.Practical implicationsThis study supported the need for future research into the social aspects of physical activity, as well as barriers to physical activity, including time, family responsibility, culture, income and neighborhood safety.Originality/valueTo the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study exploring the behavioral, normative and control beliefs of physical activity among first-generation Ethiopian immigrants. To understand the beliefs, desires and barriers to physical activity in this population subgroup, the authors examined the behavioral, normative and control beliefs of regular moderate-intensity physical activity using the theory of planned behavior as a conceptual framework. As health education researchers, it is their responsibility to develop theory-driven policies and interventions to promote a healthy lifestyle among these underserved populations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care Emerald Publishing

First-generation Ethiopian immigrants and beliefs about physical activity

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1747-9894
DOI
10.1108/ijmhsc-02-2019-0024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

While several studies have examined the attitudes, perceptions and beliefs of physical activity in different immigrant groups, little is known in this area among the first-generation Ethiopian immigrant population who lives in the USA. The purpose of this paper is to explore the behavioral, normative and control beliefs of physical activity among first-generation Ethiopian immigrants living in the DC-Metro area.Design/methodology/approachThe study used semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions and unobtrusive observation. Three structural themes and six textural themes were identified from the three forms of data collections. Qualitative data analysis including topics, categories and pattern analysis were conducted using phenomenological techniques.FindingsFindings highlighted similarities to the theory of planned behavior with regard to attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control. Consistent with the literature, several salient behavioral determinants of physical activity that could affect participants’ decision-making were identified in the current pilot study. Increased longevity, mental well-being, improved sleep and improved metabolism were listed as the most common benefits of physical activity. Lack of time, family responsibility, neighborhood safety, location of the gym, lack of awareness and social and economic stressors were the major barriers to engage in physical activity. Implications for service providers and future research are discussed.Practical implicationsThis study supported the need for future research into the social aspects of physical activity, as well as barriers to physical activity, including time, family responsibility, culture, income and neighborhood safety.Originality/valueTo the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study exploring the behavioral, normative and control beliefs of physical activity among first-generation Ethiopian immigrants. To understand the beliefs, desires and barriers to physical activity in this population subgroup, the authors examined the behavioral, normative and control beliefs of regular moderate-intensity physical activity using the theory of planned behavior as a conceptual framework. As health education researchers, it is their responsibility to develop theory-driven policies and interventions to promote a healthy lifestyle among these underserved populations.

Journal

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social CareEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2021

Keywords: Theory of planned behavior; Physical activity; Ethiopian immigrants; Healthy lifestyle activities

References