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Find out about UK environmental controls and effects

Find out about UK environmental controls and effects Focus Find out about UK environmental controls and effects civil service and trade unions. Companies are under pressure to disclose environmen­ This is a vitally important area. tal information on their existing plants and processes, There is absolutely no point in com­ panies collecting environmental data their project proposals and, increasingly, on their pro­ if they do not then use the data to ducts. make better decisions. Even the Department of the Environment The production of environmental data is an expensive (DoE) now recognises this, as was business and the results are often difficult to interpret, yet shown by the recent and, for the DoE, environmental data requirements feature in many exist­ embarrassing leak of a number of comments made by its Director- ing and proposed EEC Directives. General of Research, Dr Martin Holdgate, on internal DoE research. The business schools have been slow The Manchester Business School's This was, he said, "sloppy, turgid and in recognising that environmental lit­ Senior Management Committee has generally lacks vigour". More impor­ eracy has become an indispensable now agreed to establish, within the tantly, in this context, he argued that management skill in many sectors of School, a Centre for Environmental too much emphasis was placed on industry and, in some, the sine qua and Resource Management Studies commissioning research while insuffi­ non for survival. (CERMS). CERMS, which is expected cient time was spent on interpreting to cost at least £225,000 in its first five Ironically, at a time when most and analysing the results. Welcome, years, will devote a good deal of effort forecasts (including the latest set from CERMS. the OECD,) suggest that environ­ to environmental education for senior mental Doomsday is not just around management — from industry, the Enquiry 67. the corner, there is a growing recogni­ tion in business circles that the environmental issues which surfaced in the late 1960s and the 1970s are not going to evaporate overnight. Indeed, the legislation currently in the EEC pipeline suggests that environ­ mental constraints on some industries can only become tighter. One immediate pressure on com­ panies is the demand for sensitive data on the environmental effects of their plants, processes and, increas­ ingly, their products. External pres­ sures for disclosure have stimulated internal flows of information, some­ times in relation to specific planning applications, sometimes in relation to product notification procedures, but often in relation to the environmental acceptability of the company's day- to-day activities. Ciba-Geigy, Shell, Esso, ICI, IBM Europe and Du Pont de Nemours International are among the com­ panies sending managers and "environmental co-ordinators" to environmental seminars and courses at the Centre d'Etudes Industrielles (CEI), based in Geneva. DECEMBER 1979/JANUARY1980 11 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Management Emerald Publishing

Find out about UK environmental controls and effects

Industrial Management , Volume 79 (12): 1 – Dec 1, 1979

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0007-6929
DOI
10.1108/eb057013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Focus Find out about UK environmental controls and effects civil service and trade unions. Companies are under pressure to disclose environmen­ This is a vitally important area. tal information on their existing plants and processes, There is absolutely no point in com­ panies collecting environmental data their project proposals and, increasingly, on their pro­ if they do not then use the data to ducts. make better decisions. Even the Department of the Environment The production of environmental data is an expensive (DoE) now recognises this, as was business and the results are often difficult to interpret, yet shown by the recent and, for the DoE, environmental data requirements feature in many exist­ embarrassing leak of a number of comments made by its Director- ing and proposed EEC Directives. General of Research, Dr Martin Holdgate, on internal DoE research. The business schools have been slow The Manchester Business School's This was, he said, "sloppy, turgid and in recognising that environmental lit­ Senior Management Committee has generally lacks vigour". More impor­ eracy has become an indispensable now agreed to establish, within the tantly, in this context, he argued that management skill in many sectors of School, a Centre for Environmental too much emphasis was placed on industry and, in some, the sine qua and Resource Management Studies commissioning research while insuffi­ non for survival. (CERMS). CERMS, which is expected cient time was spent on interpreting to cost at least £225,000 in its first five Ironically, at a time when most and analysing the results. Welcome, years, will devote a good deal of effort forecasts (including the latest set from CERMS. the OECD,) suggest that environ­ to environmental education for senior mental Doomsday is not just around management — from industry, the Enquiry 67. the corner, there is a growing recogni­ tion in business circles that the environmental issues which surfaced in the late 1960s and the 1970s are not going to evaporate overnight. Indeed, the legislation currently in the EEC pipeline suggests that environ­ mental constraints on some industries can only become tighter. One immediate pressure on com­ panies is the demand for sensitive data on the environmental effects of their plants, processes and, increas­ ingly, their products. External pres­ sures for disclosure have stimulated internal flows of information, some­ times in relation to specific planning applications, sometimes in relation to product notification procedures, but often in relation to the environmental acceptability of the company's day- to-day activities. Ciba-Geigy, Shell, Esso, ICI, IBM Europe and Du Pont de Nemours International are among the com­ panies sending managers and "environmental co-ordinators" to environmental seminars and courses at the Centre d'Etudes Industrielles (CEI), based in Geneva. DECEMBER 1979/JANUARY1980 11

Journal

Industrial ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1979

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