Father leadership: the Singapore case study

Father leadership: the Singapore case study Purpose – To show and analyse the concept, practice, problems and prospects of father leadership in Singapore. The study also proposes such practices in Asian countries. Design/methodology/approach – The focus group participants, were mostly of experienced corporate and business leaders, and did not represent a cross‐section of the population; they were made of business people because of the peculiarities of Singapore's history and economy. Findings – The Singapore Government leads the way and father leadership is widely practiced. An analysis is also made of the management approach, problems and prospects of father leadership as practised in Singapore with its practices proposed in other Asian countries. Research limitations/implications – Limitations include time and costs constraints; otherwise more focus group sessions can be held and the focus group participants, mostly of experienced corporate and business leaders, did not represent a cross‐section of the population; they were made of business people because of the peculiarities of Singapore's history and economy. It is argued that a synonymous match exists between the national culture and business culture in Singapore; hence the selection of the business people in the focus group. That synonymous match is primarily because of the country's small size and lack of natural resources, and because since its birth as a modern nation, Singapore is dependent on human capital and relies strongly on its economy for its survival and growth. Practical implications – The study provides useful lessons for businesses and political analysts outside Singapore to better understand the Government's paternalistic instincts in ensuring the long‐term sustainability of Singapore's economy and her citizenry. Originality/value – The article provides a continuing perspective on governance and management in Singapore. It also extends existing studies into Confucianistic societies/ societies that are perceived by the outside world as being autocratic. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Management Decision Emerald Publishing

Father leadership: the Singapore case study

Management Decision, Volume 44 (1): 16 – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0025-1747
DOI
10.1108/00251740610641481
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – To show and analyse the concept, practice, problems and prospects of father leadership in Singapore. The study also proposes such practices in Asian countries. Design/methodology/approach – The focus group participants, were mostly of experienced corporate and business leaders, and did not represent a cross‐section of the population; they were made of business people because of the peculiarities of Singapore's history and economy. Findings – The Singapore Government leads the way and father leadership is widely practiced. An analysis is also made of the management approach, problems and prospects of father leadership as practised in Singapore with its practices proposed in other Asian countries. Research limitations/implications – Limitations include time and costs constraints; otherwise more focus group sessions can be held and the focus group participants, mostly of experienced corporate and business leaders, did not represent a cross‐section of the population; they were made of business people because of the peculiarities of Singapore's history and economy. It is argued that a synonymous match exists between the national culture and business culture in Singapore; hence the selection of the business people in the focus group. That synonymous match is primarily because of the country's small size and lack of natural resources, and because since its birth as a modern nation, Singapore is dependent on human capital and relies strongly on its economy for its survival and growth. Practical implications – The study provides useful lessons for businesses and political analysts outside Singapore to better understand the Government's paternalistic instincts in ensuring the long‐term sustainability of Singapore's economy and her citizenry. Originality/value – The article provides a continuing perspective on governance and management in Singapore. It also extends existing studies into Confucianistic societies/ societies that are perceived by the outside world as being autocratic.

Journal

Management DecisionEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2006

Keywords: Leadership; Government; Confucianism; Singapore

References

  • Virtual Singapore: shaping international competitive environments through business‐government partnerships
    Haley, U.C.V.
  • Crafted culture: governmental sculpting of modern Singapore and effects on business environments
    Haley, U.C.V.; Low, L.
  • Global Paradox
    Naisbitt, J.
  • The New Paper
    (The) New Paper

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