Fashion innovativeness and self‐concept: a replication

Fashion innovativeness and self‐concept: a replication Describes the results of a survey of 281 adult women in the state of Florida. We used the 15 adjective pairs of the Malhotra self‐concept scale to measure their self‐image. A valid and reliable self‐report scale measured their fashion innovativeness, thus identifying those consumers most likely to buy new fashions after they first appear in the market. T‐tests compared the mean scores on the self‐image adjective pairs between 30 innovators and 251 later adopters. Pearson correlation analysis was also performed. The results of both analyses showed that the fashion innovators described themselves uniquely as more comfortable, pleasant, contemporary, formal, colorful, and vain than the later adopters. The results were quite consistent with an earlier published study of college students, lending confidence to this approach to profiling fashion innovators and suggesting that using self‐image could be a fruitful way to appeal to these important consumers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Product & Brand Management Emerald Publishing

Fashion innovativeness and self‐concept: a replication

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1061-0421
DOI
10.1108/10610429910257904
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Describes the results of a survey of 281 adult women in the state of Florida. We used the 15 adjective pairs of the Malhotra self‐concept scale to measure their self‐image. A valid and reliable self‐report scale measured their fashion innovativeness, thus identifying those consumers most likely to buy new fashions after they first appear in the market. T‐tests compared the mean scores on the self‐image adjective pairs between 30 innovators and 251 later adopters. Pearson correlation analysis was also performed. The results of both analyses showed that the fashion innovators described themselves uniquely as more comfortable, pleasant, contemporary, formal, colorful, and vain than the later adopters. The results were quite consistent with an earlier published study of college students, lending confidence to this approach to profiling fashion innovators and suggesting that using self‐image could be a fruitful way to appeal to these important consumers.

Journal

Journal of Product & Brand ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1999

Keywords: Clothing; Consumer behaviour; Fashion; Image; Innovation; Marketing strategy

References

  • Consumer behaviour towards fashion
    Evans, M
  • Identifying innovators in consumer product markets
    Goldsmith, R.E.; Flynn, L.R.
  • Measuring consumer innovativeness
    Goldsmith, R.E; Hofacker, C.F.
  • Social values and fashion leadership
    Goldsmith, R.E.; Heitmeyer, J.R.; Freiden, J.B.
  • Adopter categories in the acceptance process for consumer durables
    Martinez, E. ; Polo, Y.
  • Redefining new product development: learning to actualize consumer contributions
    Pitta, D.A; Franzak, F; Katsanis, L.P

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