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Family expectations and transition experiences for young adults with severe disabilities: does syndrome matter?

Family expectations and transition experiences for young adults with severe disabilities: does... The differential impact of young adult diagnosis on families during the period of transition from school to adult life was examined. Participants were parents of 246 young adults with severe learning disability aged 18‐26. Young adults were classified into four diagnostic groups: autism (N = 30), Down's syndrome (N = 68), cerebral palsy (N = 95) and an undifferentiated learning disability group (N = 53). Research questions pertained to parent expectations about their young adults' transition to living and working environments post high school. Parental satisfaction and worries were also assessed. The results indicated more community expectations of work for young adults with Down's syndrome, and more restrictive expectations for young adults with autism, including more expectations that young adults with autism would move out of the family home into a residential environment. Parents of young adults with autism also worried significantly more about various aspects of transition than other parent groups. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities Emerald Publishing

Family expectations and transition experiences for young adults with severe disabilities: does syndrome matter?

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References (49)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1753-0180
DOI
10.5042/amhld.2010.0052
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The differential impact of young adult diagnosis on families during the period of transition from school to adult life was examined. Participants were parents of 246 young adults with severe learning disability aged 18‐26. Young adults were classified into four diagnostic groups: autism (N = 30), Down's syndrome (N = 68), cerebral palsy (N = 95) and an undifferentiated learning disability group (N = 53). Research questions pertained to parent expectations about their young adults' transition to living and working environments post high school. Parental satisfaction and worries were also assessed. The results indicated more community expectations of work for young adults with Down's syndrome, and more restrictive expectations for young adults with autism, including more expectations that young adults with autism would move out of the family home into a residential environment. Parents of young adults with autism also worried significantly more about various aspects of transition than other parent groups.

Journal

Advances in Mental Health and Learning DisabilitiesEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 15, 2010

Keywords: Transition; Autism; Syndrome; Families; Learning disability; Intellectual disabilities

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