Facilitators and barriers in dual recovery: a literature review of first‐person perspectives

Facilitators and barriers in dual recovery: a literature review of first‐person perspectives Purpose – The co‐occurrence of mental health and substance use problems is prevalent, and has been problematic both in terms of its complexity for the person and of the challenges it poses to health care practitioners. Recovery in co‐occurring mental health and substance use problems is viewed as with multiple challenges embedded in it. As most of the existing literature on recovery tends to treat recovery in mental health and substance use problems separately, it is critical to assess the nature of our current understanding of what has been described as “complex” or “dual” recovery. The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss what persons with co‐occurring mental health and substance use problems describe as facilitators and barriers in their recovery process as revealed in the literature. Design/methodology/approach – The method used for this study was a small‐scale review of the literature gleaned from a wider general view. Searches were conducted in CINAHL, Psych info, Medline, Embase, SweMed+, and NORART. Findings – Three overarching themes were identified as facilitators of dual recovery: first, meaningful everyday life; second, focus on strengths and future orientation; and third, re‐establishing a social life and supportive relationships. Two overarching themes were identified as barriers to dual recovery: first, lack of tailored help and second, complex systems and uncoordinated services. Originality/value – The recovery literature mostly focuses on recovery in mental health and substance use problems separately, with less attention being paid in the first‐person literature to what helps and what hinders dual recovery. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advances in Dual Diagnosis Emerald Publishing

Facilitators and barriers in dual recovery: a literature review of first‐person perspectives

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, Volume 7 (3): 11 – Aug 12, 2014

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1757-0972
D.O.I.
10.1108/ADD-02-2014-0007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The co‐occurrence of mental health and substance use problems is prevalent, and has been problematic both in terms of its complexity for the person and of the challenges it poses to health care practitioners. Recovery in co‐occurring mental health and substance use problems is viewed as with multiple challenges embedded in it. As most of the existing literature on recovery tends to treat recovery in mental health and substance use problems separately, it is critical to assess the nature of our current understanding of what has been described as “complex” or “dual” recovery. The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss what persons with co‐occurring mental health and substance use problems describe as facilitators and barriers in their recovery process as revealed in the literature. Design/methodology/approach – The method used for this study was a small‐scale review of the literature gleaned from a wider general view. Searches were conducted in CINAHL, Psych info, Medline, Embase, SweMed+, and NORART. Findings – Three overarching themes were identified as facilitators of dual recovery: first, meaningful everyday life; second, focus on strengths and future orientation; and third, re‐establishing a social life and supportive relationships. Two overarching themes were identified as barriers to dual recovery: first, lack of tailored help and second, complex systems and uncoordinated services. Originality/value – The recovery literature mostly focuses on recovery in mental health and substance use problems separately, with less attention being paid in the first‐person literature to what helps and what hinders dual recovery.

Journal

Advances in Dual DiagnosisEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 12, 2014

Keywords: Dual diagnosis; Literature review; Co‐occurent disorders; First‐person perspectives; Recovery processes

References

  • Collaborative relationships and dialogic conversations: ideas for a relationally responsive practice
    Anderson, H.
  • Examining a progressive model of self‐stigma and its impact on people with serious mental illness
    Corrigan, P.W.; Rafaecz, J.; Rüsch, N.
  • Us and them
    Davidson, L.
  • Integrated versus non‐integrated management and care for clients with co‐occurring mental health and substance use disorders: a qualitative systematic review of randomised controlled trials
    Donald, M.; Dower, J.; Kavanagh, D.
  • Dual diagnosis, as described by those who experience the disorder: using the Internet as a source of data
    Edward, K.‐L.; Robins, A.
  • Conceptualizing stigma
    Link, B.G.; Phelan, J.C.
  • Social factors and recovery from mental health difficulties: a review of the evidence
    Tew, J.; Ramon, S.; Slade, M.; Bird, V.; Melton, J.; Le Boutillier, C.

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