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Explaining about death and dying

Explaining about death and dying Feature Gilli Crick Home Manager, Rockdale Housing Association’s residential care home for older people, Sevenoaks, Kent In the final article of our ‘Explaining about…’ series, Gilli Crick explains about Explaining death and dying for residents in care homes. about… Some years ago, a 35- year-old school friend of mine was dying of cancer. She’d had the surgery and the radio- and chemotherapy and had death and gone home to spend her remaining time with her husband and two young daughters. I would drop by and we’d drink tea, eat large, unsuitable cream dying buns, talk and laugh about shared history. She was, in turns, all the things you’d expect – angry, frightened, resentful, and desperate not to let go of her life until she absolutely had to; but, after weeks of mulling over when and how this important event was to be managed, she did gradually arrive at some sort of grudging acceptance. Shortly before she died, she said: ‘Oh, it’s such a relief when you’re here; you’re the only person who lets me talk about my own death.’ Talking Death happens quite a lot in a home for older people. Each year, around 19% of the total numbers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Working with Older People Emerald Publishing

Explaining about death and dying

Working with Older People , Volume 8 (4): 4 – Dec 1, 2004

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1366-3666
DOI
10.1108/13663666200400053
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Feature Gilli Crick Home Manager, Rockdale Housing Association’s residential care home for older people, Sevenoaks, Kent In the final article of our ‘Explaining about…’ series, Gilli Crick explains about Explaining death and dying for residents in care homes. about… Some years ago, a 35- year-old school friend of mine was dying of cancer. She’d had the surgery and the radio- and chemotherapy and had death and gone home to spend her remaining time with her husband and two young daughters. I would drop by and we’d drink tea, eat large, unsuitable cream dying buns, talk and laugh about shared history. She was, in turns, all the things you’d expect – angry, frightened, resentful, and desperate not to let go of her life until she absolutely had to; but, after weeks of mulling over when and how this important event was to be managed, she did gradually arrive at some sort of grudging acceptance. Shortly before she died, she said: ‘Oh, it’s such a relief when you’re here; you’re the only person who lets me talk about my own death.’ Talking Death happens quite a lot in a home for older people. Each year, around 19% of the total numbers

Journal

Working with Older PeopleEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2004

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