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Expensing e-books: how much should patron habit influence collection development?

Expensing e-books: how much should patron habit influence collection development? Purpose– The purpose of this article is explore the difficulties in managing print and e-book expenditures in today’s libraries. Design/methodology/approach– The basis for this article stems from conflicting data showing patrons desiring to read more e-books versus print books at the beginning of the very e-book movement, and more recent studies showing this trend plateauing while e-book reading device purchasing increases. Findings– Two different phenomena may be occurring in tandem or separately in this case: less people are reading while having increased capacity to read e-books; libraries are adding more e-book content while print book reading is not falling off as fast as previously anticipated. Originality/value– E-book expense allocations are far from an exact science. Library budget managers are in need for continued research and insight to guide decision-making. This article adds to extant research in this area providing support for a “wait-and-see” approach toward spending on e-books. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Bottom Line Managing Library Finances Emerald Publishing

Expensing e-books: how much should patron habit influence collection development?

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0888-045X
DOI
10.1108/BL-09-2014-0023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose– The purpose of this article is explore the difficulties in managing print and e-book expenditures in today’s libraries. Design/methodology/approach– The basis for this article stems from conflicting data showing patrons desiring to read more e-books versus print books at the beginning of the very e-book movement, and more recent studies showing this trend plateauing while e-book reading device purchasing increases. Findings– Two different phenomena may be occurring in tandem or separately in this case: less people are reading while having increased capacity to read e-books; libraries are adding more e-book content while print book reading is not falling off as fast as previously anticipated. Originality/value– E-book expense allocations are far from an exact science. Library budget managers are in need for continued research and insight to guide decision-making. This article adds to extant research in this area providing support for a “wait-and-see” approach toward spending on e-books.

Journal

The Bottom Line Managing Library FinancesEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 25, 2014

There are no references for this article.