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Executive remuneration: the power and dominance of human greed

Executive remuneration: the power and dominance of human greed PurposeThe paper aims to examine the role of human greed in the determination of executive remuneration in the UK.Design/methodology/approachThe paper reviews the past and existing regulation and corporate governance recommendations on executive remuneration.FindingsThe paper demonstrates that the failure of regulatory mechanisms to curb excessive executive remuneration can be justified on the grounds of human greed. Greed is facilitated by the potential conflict of interest that exists as a result of the executives’ position in the company. The position of the law has given greed the opportunity to manifest, making it quite difficult for executive remuneration to be effectively regulated.Originality/valueThe paper adds to the existing debate on excessive executive remuneration by demonstrating that human greed is the basis of excessive executive remuneration on which limited literature exists. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Financial Crime Emerald Publishing

Executive remuneration: the power and dominance of human greed

Journal of Financial Crime , Volume 26 (4): 15 – Oct 7, 2019

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1359-0790
DOI
10.1108/JFC-06-2017-0059
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe paper aims to examine the role of human greed in the determination of executive remuneration in the UK.Design/methodology/approachThe paper reviews the past and existing regulation and corporate governance recommendations on executive remuneration.FindingsThe paper demonstrates that the failure of regulatory mechanisms to curb excessive executive remuneration can be justified on the grounds of human greed. Greed is facilitated by the potential conflict of interest that exists as a result of the executives’ position in the company. The position of the law has given greed the opportunity to manifest, making it quite difficult for executive remuneration to be effectively regulated.Originality/valueThe paper adds to the existing debate on excessive executive remuneration by demonstrating that human greed is the basis of excessive executive remuneration on which limited literature exists.

Journal

Journal of Financial CrimeEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 7, 2019

References