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Executive Management for Women

Executive Management for Women In considering critical areas of human resource development, and upon reviewing the literature on women in management, it became obvious that there was a need for a Management Development program that is targeted specifically to women at senior levels of management. The record of course providers in attracting women to participate in existing mixed Executive Development Programs has not been very good, poorer indeed than the proportion of senior women in organizations, which by itself is not at an acceptable level. The research suggests that women generally are less likely to actively seek positions of high profile leadership due to historical social stereotypes of women and the lack of obvious women executive models Arkkelin, & Simons, 1985 Baril, Elbert, MaherPotter, & Reavy, 1989. They are unable and unwilling to absent themselves from families and careers to the same extent as males in our society. Indeed, in the case of women with children, there are very strong norms against women leaving family and children to persue their own professional development Riger, & Galligan, 1980. Quite the opposite norm exists for males with children who are obviously rewarded in our society for pursuing training and development opportunities which can enhance their career development Powell, 1988. Thus, the residential and extended time components of current Executive Development Programs are often inconvenient and unsuitable for the majority of women who aspire to or have achieved senior level positions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Equal Opportunities International Emerald Publishing

Executive Management for Women

Equal Opportunities International , Volume 10 (3/4): 9 – Mar 1, 1991

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0261-0159
DOI
10.1108/eb010552
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In considering critical areas of human resource development, and upon reviewing the literature on women in management, it became obvious that there was a need for a Management Development program that is targeted specifically to women at senior levels of management. The record of course providers in attracting women to participate in existing mixed Executive Development Programs has not been very good, poorer indeed than the proportion of senior women in organizations, which by itself is not at an acceptable level. The research suggests that women generally are less likely to actively seek positions of high profile leadership due to historical social stereotypes of women and the lack of obvious women executive models Arkkelin, & Simons, 1985 Baril, Elbert, MaherPotter, & Reavy, 1989. They are unable and unwilling to absent themselves from families and careers to the same extent as males in our society. Indeed, in the case of women with children, there are very strong norms against women leaving family and children to persue their own professional development Riger, & Galligan, 1980. Quite the opposite norm exists for males with children who are obviously rewarded in our society for pursuing training and development opportunities which can enhance their career development Powell, 1988. Thus, the residential and extended time components of current Executive Development Programs are often inconvenient and unsuitable for the majority of women who aspire to or have achieved senior level positions.

Journal

Equal Opportunities InternationalEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1991

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