Executive and management attitudes towards corporate social responsibility in Malaysia

Executive and management attitudes towards corporate social responsibility in Malaysia Examines the attitudes of Malaysian managers and executives towards social responsibility and also the extent of socially responsible activities involved, corporate disclosure, and the factors determining the attitudes towards social responsibility. A structured questionnaire was developed based on studies by Ford and McLaughin, Teoh and Gregory Thong, Gill and Leinbach and Jones. A total of 198 responses were used for analysis in this study. The results showed that only five statements (of the 14 statements) have scores of more than 50 per cent agreement or endorsement of socially responsible activities. About 69 per cent of the respondents believed that involvement by a business in improving its community’s quality of life will also improve long run profitability. Nearly 65 per cent agreed that socially responsible activities provide a favourable public image. The analysis of variance showed that there were significant differences in the attitudes of managers working in banking, telecommunication, manufacturing and construction towards social responsibility. Nearly all of the respondents agreed that their companies were involved in socially responsible activities, that they were responsive to consumers’ complaints (83 per cent), and that they were maintaining product/service quality (77 per cent). Of the respondents nearly 54 per cent mentioned that their companies informed the general public of their socially responsible activities. The results also showed that the most influential factor determining the attitude towards social responsibility was family upbringing. The other important factors were traditional beliefs and customs, and common practices in the industry. Discusses the implications of the findings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Corporate Governance Emerald Publishing

Executive and management attitudes towards corporate social responsibility in Malaysia

Corporate Governance, Volume 2 (4): 7 – Dec 1, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/executive-and-management-attitudes-towards-corporate-social-Qk0I06eQ5t
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1472-0701
DOI
10.1108/14720700210447641
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Examines the attitudes of Malaysian managers and executives towards social responsibility and also the extent of socially responsible activities involved, corporate disclosure, and the factors determining the attitudes towards social responsibility. A structured questionnaire was developed based on studies by Ford and McLaughin, Teoh and Gregory Thong, Gill and Leinbach and Jones. A total of 198 responses were used for analysis in this study. The results showed that only five statements (of the 14 statements) have scores of more than 50 per cent agreement or endorsement of socially responsible activities. About 69 per cent of the respondents believed that involvement by a business in improving its community’s quality of life will also improve long run profitability. Nearly 65 per cent agreed that socially responsible activities provide a favourable public image. The analysis of variance showed that there were significant differences in the attitudes of managers working in banking, telecommunication, manufacturing and construction towards social responsibility. Nearly all of the respondents agreed that their companies were involved in socially responsible activities, that they were responsive to consumers’ complaints (83 per cent), and that they were maintaining product/service quality (77 per cent). Of the respondents nearly 54 per cent mentioned that their companies informed the general public of their socially responsible activities. The results also showed that the most influential factor determining the attitude towards social responsibility was family upbringing. The other important factors were traditional beliefs and customs, and common practices in the industry. Discusses the implications of the findings.

Journal

Corporate GovernanceEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2002

Keywords: Social responsibility; Corporate governance; Disclosure; Involvement; Malaysia

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month