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Examining preservice teachers' levels of self-efficacy perceptions regarding Web

Examining preservice teachers' levels of self-efficacy perceptions regarding Web PurposeThis study aims to focus on how preservice teachers' academic achievements, their frequencies of connecting to the distance learning management system, their gender and the related sub-scales influence their Web-based self-efficacies (WEB-PCK) and their attitudes towards distance education (WBI).Design/methodology/approachIn the study, the structural equality model was used. In the path analysis, the maximum likelihood estimation method was used to predict the parameters of the model. This method allows determining the highest values for the population and the probability of the sample value to occur.FindingsIt was found that the sub-scale of Web communication (WEB-C) had a high level of direct and positive influence on the male preservice teachers' self-efficacy perceptions. As for the female preservice teachers, WEB-C did not have any direct influence on their self-efficacy perceptions. For the male preservice teachers, Web pedagogy (WEB-PC) had positive influence on their self-efficacy perceptions (β = 0.193), while the sub-scale of WEB-PC had a high level of influence on the female preservice teachers' self-efficacy perceptions (β = 0.534).Originality/valueIn the study, the purpose of was to examine the effects of the attitudes of the preservice teachers towards Web general (WEB-G), Web-Communication (WEB-C), Web pedagogical knowledge (WEB-PK), Web pedagogical self-efficacy (WEB-PCK) and Web-based instruction (WBI) with the help of the structural equation model with respect to gender, frequency of connection to the internet and academic achievement grades. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology Emerald Publishing

Examining preservice teachers' levels of self-efficacy perceptions regarding Web

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2056-4880
DOI
10.1108/IJILT-11-2019-0105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThis study aims to focus on how preservice teachers' academic achievements, their frequencies of connecting to the distance learning management system, their gender and the related sub-scales influence their Web-based self-efficacies (WEB-PCK) and their attitudes towards distance education (WBI).Design/methodology/approachIn the study, the structural equality model was used. In the path analysis, the maximum likelihood estimation method was used to predict the parameters of the model. This method allows determining the highest values for the population and the probability of the sample value to occur.FindingsIt was found that the sub-scale of Web communication (WEB-C) had a high level of direct and positive influence on the male preservice teachers' self-efficacy perceptions. As for the female preservice teachers, WEB-C did not have any direct influence on their self-efficacy perceptions. For the male preservice teachers, Web pedagogy (WEB-PC) had positive influence on their self-efficacy perceptions (β = 0.193), while the sub-scale of WEB-PC had a high level of influence on the female preservice teachers' self-efficacy perceptions (β = 0.534).Originality/valueIn the study, the purpose of was to examine the effects of the attitudes of the preservice teachers towards Web general (WEB-G), Web-Communication (WEB-C), Web pedagogical knowledge (WEB-PK), Web pedagogical self-efficacy (WEB-PCK) and Web-based instruction (WBI) with the help of the structural equation model with respect to gender, frequency of connection to the internet and academic achievement grades.

Journal

The International Journal of Information and Learning TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 23, 2020

References