Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Evolution of atmospheric aerosol particles during a pollution accumulation process: a case study

Evolution of atmospheric aerosol particles during a pollution accumulation process: a case study The characteristics of fine aerosol particles were investigated at an urban site in Beijing during an atmospheric pollution accumulation process. The organics, sulfate and BC were the dominant components in fine particles in the clear air, and the concentrations of organics, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium increased during the haze formation. The mass concentrations of primary species (chloride and BC) in the clear air were similar to those in the haze. The morphology, mixing state and aging status of fine particles in the clear air were different from those in the haze. Accumulation secondary particles were detected with high frequency and accumulation secondary particles with coating were rare in all the samples. The frequency of soot particles with coating in the clear air was lower than that in the haze. The number ratio of accumulation secondary particles to soot containing particles changed from 3:1 in clear air to 2:3 in the haze. These results indicated that the number frequency of accumulation secondary particles decreased while that of the soot containing particles increased with the air pollutants accumulating. The core-shell ratio of coated soot particles ranged between 0.1–0.6 was 62% in the clear air, and 82% in the haze. The mode sizes for the core and the shell of soot particles were 0.35 μm and 0.55 μm in the clear air, and 0.35 μm and 1.0 μm in the haze, respectively. The mean diameters of the core and the shell were 0.3 μm and was 0.6 μm in the clear air, and 0.4 μm and 1.0 μm in the haze, respectively. These results indicated that with the air pollution accumulating, the frequency of accumulation secondary particles decreased while the soot containing particles increased. The aging process of soot particles was stronger in the haze, and resulted in greater hygroscopicity for soot particles in the haze. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png World Journal of Engineering Emerald Publishing

Evolution of atmospheric aerosol particles during a pollution accumulation process: a case study

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/evolution-of-atmospheric-aerosol-particles-during-a-pollution-LDssoJDiGY
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1708-5284
DOI
10.1260/1708-5284.12.1.51
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The characteristics of fine aerosol particles were investigated at an urban site in Beijing during an atmospheric pollution accumulation process. The organics, sulfate and BC were the dominant components in fine particles in the clear air, and the concentrations of organics, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium increased during the haze formation. The mass concentrations of primary species (chloride and BC) in the clear air were similar to those in the haze. The morphology, mixing state and aging status of fine particles in the clear air were different from those in the haze. Accumulation secondary particles were detected with high frequency and accumulation secondary particles with coating were rare in all the samples. The frequency of soot particles with coating in the clear air was lower than that in the haze. The number ratio of accumulation secondary particles to soot containing particles changed from 3:1 in clear air to 2:3 in the haze. These results indicated that the number frequency of accumulation secondary particles decreased while that of the soot containing particles increased with the air pollutants accumulating. The core-shell ratio of coated soot particles ranged between 0.1–0.6 was 62% in the clear air, and 82% in the haze. The mode sizes for the core and the shell of soot particles were 0.35 μm and 0.55 μm in the clear air, and 0.35 μm and 1.0 μm in the haze, respectively. The mean diameters of the core and the shell were 0.3 μm and was 0.6 μm in the clear air, and 0.4 μm and 1.0 μm in the haze, respectively. These results indicated that with the air pollution accumulating, the frequency of accumulation secondary particles decreased while the soot containing particles increased. The aging process of soot particles was stronger in the haze, and resulted in greater hygroscopicity for soot particles in the haze.

Journal

World Journal of EngineeringEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 2015

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month