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Evaluation of ICT literacy differences in trainee student teachers from the view of sexuality

Evaluation of ICT literacy differences in trainee student teachers from the view of sexuality Purpose – The aim of this paper is to evaluate ICT literacy differences in trainee student teachers from the view of sexuality. Design/methodology/approach – In the research, sender differences in self‐reported ICT experience and ICT literacy among first year graduate trainee teachers were investigated. The questionnaires were made available in two forms: printed and online. Also, dynamic model of ICT literacy was employed. Three main components of aspiring teachers' ICT literacy were covered: present general problem‐solving and technical ICT capabilities; situational and longitudinal sustainability; and transferability of ICT capabilities into future professional domain. Findings – Results show no significant differences were found between females' and males' previous experience with ICT. However, males on average worked with computers significantly more hours per week than females. Significant differences between males' and females' technical ICT capabilities and situational and longitudinal sustainability were observed. Males' scores were higher. In the regression analysis, when the impact of the background and ICT experience variables was controlled, gender failed to be a significant predictor of the sustainability scores. However, it remained a significant predictor of some trainee teachers' scores, related to their technical ICT capabilities. Originality/value – This paper adds to the literature on the evaluation of ICT literacy differences in trainee student teachers from the view of sexuality and will be of interest to those in the field. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Campus-Wide Information Systems Emerald Publishing

Evaluation of ICT literacy differences in trainee student teachers from the view of sexuality

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References (35)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1065-0741
DOI
10.1108/10650740810886349
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The aim of this paper is to evaluate ICT literacy differences in trainee student teachers from the view of sexuality. Design/methodology/approach – In the research, sender differences in self‐reported ICT experience and ICT literacy among first year graduate trainee teachers were investigated. The questionnaires were made available in two forms: printed and online. Also, dynamic model of ICT literacy was employed. Three main components of aspiring teachers' ICT literacy were covered: present general problem‐solving and technical ICT capabilities; situational and longitudinal sustainability; and transferability of ICT capabilities into future professional domain. Findings – Results show no significant differences were found between females' and males' previous experience with ICT. However, males on average worked with computers significantly more hours per week than females. Significant differences between males' and females' technical ICT capabilities and situational and longitudinal sustainability were observed. Males' scores were higher. In the regression analysis, when the impact of the background and ICT experience variables was controlled, gender failed to be a significant predictor of the sustainability scores. However, it remained a significant predictor of some trainee teachers' scores, related to their technical ICT capabilities. Originality/value – This paper adds to the literature on the evaluation of ICT literacy differences in trainee student teachers from the view of sexuality and will be of interest to those in the field.

Journal

Campus-Wide Information SystemsEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 20, 2008

Keywords: Communication technologies; Education colleges; Culture; Sexuality; Iran

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