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Evaluating the effectiveness of a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events for clinical incident reporting in Trauma and Orthopaedics A follow‐up study

Evaluating the effectiveness of a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events for clinical... Purpose – The first phase of this study developed a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events for clinical incident reporting in Trauma and Orthopaedics. This follow‐up study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the adverse event list. Design/methodology/approach – Two follow‐up questionnaires were sent to healthcare professionals working in Trauma and Orthopaedics in two of the participating National Health Service (NHS) Trusts ( n =247 for the first questionnaire and n =240 for the second questionnaire). Trends in routine incident reporting data were also monitored over a two‐year period to determine the impact of the adverse event list on levels of adverse event reporting. Findings – The questionnaires indicated that awareness about the adverse event list was good and improved between questionnaires. However usage of the adverse event list appeared to be poor. Multiple regression analysis with the dependent variable count of orthopaedic incidents suggested that the adverse event list had little, if any impact on levels of reporting in Trauma and Orthopaedics. Originality/value – The results of this study suggest that a practical tool, such as the adverse event list has little impact on incident reporting levels. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Governance: An International Journal Emerald Publishing

Evaluating the effectiveness of a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events for clinical incident reporting in Trauma and Orthopaedics A follow‐up study

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1477-7274
DOI
10.1108/14777270510612866
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The first phase of this study developed a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events for clinical incident reporting in Trauma and Orthopaedics. This follow‐up study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the adverse event list. Design/methodology/approach – Two follow‐up questionnaires were sent to healthcare professionals working in Trauma and Orthopaedics in two of the participating National Health Service (NHS) Trusts ( n =247 for the first questionnaire and n =240 for the second questionnaire). Trends in routine incident reporting data were also monitored over a two‐year period to determine the impact of the adverse event list on levels of adverse event reporting. Findings – The questionnaires indicated that awareness about the adverse event list was good and improved between questionnaires. However usage of the adverse event list appeared to be poor. Multiple regression analysis with the dependent variable count of orthopaedic incidents suggested that the adverse event list had little, if any impact on levels of reporting in Trauma and Orthopaedics. Originality/value – The results of this study suggest that a practical tool, such as the adverse event list has little impact on incident reporting levels.

Journal

Clinical Governance: An International JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2005

Keywords: Clinical audit; Patients; Safety; Reports

References