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Evaluating technology resistance and technology satisfaction on students' performance

Evaluating technology resistance and technology satisfaction on students' performance Purpose – Using the extended task‐technology fit (TTF) model, this paper aims to examine technology resistance, technology satisfaction and internet usage on students' performance. Design/methodology/approach – The study was conducted at Universiti Teknologi MARA, Johor, Malaysia and questionnaires were distributed to 354 undergraduate students. Findings – The structural equation modelling (SEM) results indicate that technology satisfaction and the internet usage significantly explains the variance on students' performance. Task‐technology fit is not a predictor of technology resistance but it does predict the internet usage. The internet usage has greater impact on technology satisfaction than technology satisfaction on the internet usage. Finally, technology resistance is not a predictor of students' performance. Research limitations/implications – The study focuses only on education in Malaysia and concentrates only on the students' performance and the relationship between technology resistance, technology satisfaction and the internet usage. Practical implications – The results provide insights on how Malaysian education systems of a similar structure could improve upon their internet adoption. Originality/value – This study is perhaps one of the first to address internet adoption in education using an extended task‐technology fit model (task‐technology fit, internet usage, technology resistance, technology satisfaction) to investigate their influences on students' performance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Campus-Wide Information Systems Emerald Publishing

Evaluating technology resistance and technology satisfaction on students' performance

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1065-0741
DOI
10.1108/10650740910984637
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Using the extended task‐technology fit (TTF) model, this paper aims to examine technology resistance, technology satisfaction and internet usage on students' performance. Design/methodology/approach – The study was conducted at Universiti Teknologi MARA, Johor, Malaysia and questionnaires were distributed to 354 undergraduate students. Findings – The structural equation modelling (SEM) results indicate that technology satisfaction and the internet usage significantly explains the variance on students' performance. Task‐technology fit is not a predictor of technology resistance but it does predict the internet usage. The internet usage has greater impact on technology satisfaction than technology satisfaction on the internet usage. Finally, technology resistance is not a predictor of students' performance. Research limitations/implications – The study focuses only on education in Malaysia and concentrates only on the students' performance and the relationship between technology resistance, technology satisfaction and the internet usage. Practical implications – The results provide insights on how Malaysian education systems of a similar structure could improve upon their internet adoption. Originality/value – This study is perhaps one of the first to address internet adoption in education using an extended task‐technology fit model (task‐technology fit, internet usage, technology resistance, technology satisfaction) to investigate their influences on students' performance.

Journal

Campus-Wide Information SystemsEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 28, 2009

Keywords: Communication technologies; Customer satisfaction; Internet; Students; Malaysia; Learning

References

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