Ethnocentricity in top marketing journals

Ethnocentricity in top marketing journals Purpose – To draw up a demographic profile of editors, editorial boards and contributors, in the specific case of one top‐ranked marketing journal, and to discuss the implications. Design/methodology/approach – From a list of top‐ranked titles, compiled from various sources, one was chosen as a case study. Demographic data relating to contributors and editors were collected by inspection, for a five‐year period. The anonymity of the journal was preserved. Findings – North American affiliations dominated among authors, editors and editorial boards. Successive editors have had an American affiliation for many years. This strongly skewed demographic profile raises a number of doubts and questions. The author suggests that one important effect is a kind of academic myopia, caused by demographic uniformity and paradigmatic inertia. He contends that this phenomenon threatens to weaken the scientific reputation of the marketing discipline and its research community. Research limitations/implications – The study is restricted to a single top‐ranked journal, which is anonymous because the aim is not to focus attention, negative or positive, on a single case, but rather to stimulate debate. Practical implications – Tentative recommendations are offered to the publishers and editors of marketing journals for reduction of the specific and general damaging effects of demographically induced academic myopia. Originality/value – This study sows the seed and provides the trigger for further research and discussion of a phenomenon with important practical implications for the academic marketing community. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marketing Intelligence & Planning Emerald Publishing

Ethnocentricity in top marketing journals

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, Volume 23 (5): 13 – Aug 1, 2005

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0263-4503
DOI
10.1108/02634500510612618
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – To draw up a demographic profile of editors, editorial boards and contributors, in the specific case of one top‐ranked marketing journal, and to discuss the implications. Design/methodology/approach – From a list of top‐ranked titles, compiled from various sources, one was chosen as a case study. Demographic data relating to contributors and editors were collected by inspection, for a five‐year period. The anonymity of the journal was preserved. Findings – North American affiliations dominated among authors, editors and editorial boards. Successive editors have had an American affiliation for many years. This strongly skewed demographic profile raises a number of doubts and questions. The author suggests that one important effect is a kind of academic myopia, caused by demographic uniformity and paradigmatic inertia. He contends that this phenomenon threatens to weaken the scientific reputation of the marketing discipline and its research community. Research limitations/implications – The study is restricted to a single top‐ranked journal, which is anonymous because the aim is not to focus attention, negative or positive, on a single case, but rather to stimulate debate. Practical implications – Tentative recommendations are offered to the publishers and editors of marketing journals for reduction of the specific and general damaging effects of demographically induced academic myopia. Originality/value – This study sows the seed and provides the trigger for further research and discussion of a phenomenon with important practical implications for the academic marketing community.

Journal

Marketing Intelligence & PlanningEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 2005

Keywords: Serials; Inertia; Product management; Case studies

References

  • How effectively do marketing journals transfer useful learning from scholars to practitioners?
    Crosier, K.
  • Quality indicators in academic publishing
    Day, A.; Peters, J.

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