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Ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and eating disorder symptomatology in Canada: implications for mental health care

Ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and eating disorder symptomatology in Canada: implications for... Purpose – There is a gap in the understanding of relationships between socioeconomic status (SES), urban-rural differences, ethnicity and eating disorder symptomatology. This gap has implications for access to treatment and the effectiveness of treatment. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach – Data are presented from a major Canadian survey, analyzing the impact of body mass index (BMI), urban-non-urban residency, income, and ethnicity on eating disorder symptomatology. Findings – One of the strongest findings is that high income non-White women expressed less eating disorder symptomatology than lower income non-White women. Research limitations/implications – Future research needs to consider how factors such as urban residency, exposure to Western “thinness” ideals, and income differentials impact non-White women. Practical implications – Effective treatment of ethnic minority women requires an appreciation of complicated effects of “culture clash,” income and BMI on eating disorder symptomatology. Originality/value – This study makes a unique contribution to the literature by examining relationships between SES (income) and eating disorder symptomatology in White and non-White Canadian women. The review of the scientific literature on ethnic differences in eating disorder symptomatology revealed a disparity gap in treatment. This disparity may be a by-product of bias and lack of understanding of gender or ethnic/cultural differences by practitioners. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care Emerald Publishing

Ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and eating disorder symptomatology in Canada: implications for mental health care

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1757-0980
DOI
10.1108/EIHSC-10-2013-0038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – There is a gap in the understanding of relationships between socioeconomic status (SES), urban-rural differences, ethnicity and eating disorder symptomatology. This gap has implications for access to treatment and the effectiveness of treatment. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach – Data are presented from a major Canadian survey, analyzing the impact of body mass index (BMI), urban-non-urban residency, income, and ethnicity on eating disorder symptomatology. Findings – One of the strongest findings is that high income non-White women expressed less eating disorder symptomatology than lower income non-White women. Research limitations/implications – Future research needs to consider how factors such as urban residency, exposure to Western “thinness” ideals, and income differentials impact non-White women. Practical implications – Effective treatment of ethnic minority women requires an appreciation of complicated effects of “culture clash,” income and BMI on eating disorder symptomatology. Originality/value – This study makes a unique contribution to the literature by examining relationships between SES (income) and eating disorder symptomatology in White and non-White Canadian women. The review of the scientific literature on ethnic differences in eating disorder symptomatology revealed a disparity gap in treatment. This disparity may be a by-product of bias and lack of understanding of gender or ethnic/cultural differences by practitioners.

Journal

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social CareEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 9, 2014

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