Equivalence of survey data: relevance for international marketing

Equivalence of survey data: relevance for international marketing Purpose – The paper presents a framework for establishing equivalence of international marketing data. The framework is meant to reduce confusion about equivalence issues, and guide the design of international studies and data analysis. Design/methodology/approach – A short overview is given of the two main approaches to equivalence in the literature. These are integrated and used to distinguish sources of cultural bias in the various stages of the research process. Findings – The highest levels of equivalence most often established are construct equivalence and partial measurement equivalence, implying that distributions of scores obtained in various countries cannot be interpreted at face value. To understand cross‐cultural differences better, researchers should investigate why higher levels of equivalence could not be established; this can be done best by including elements from both the conceptual and the measurement approach to equivalence. Practical implications – This study can help marketing managers to establish the extent to which consumer perceptions can be considered equal across countries. Moreover, it helps researchers to determine causes of unequivalence and relate these to concrete stages in the research process. Originality/value – Integration of the two main approaches to equivalence will lead to a better understanding of the validity of cross‐cultural differences and similarities. This should lead to improved decision making in international marketing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Marketing Emerald Publishing

Equivalence of survey data: relevance for international marketing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0309-0566
DOI
10.1108/03090560510581818
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The paper presents a framework for establishing equivalence of international marketing data. The framework is meant to reduce confusion about equivalence issues, and guide the design of international studies and data analysis. Design/methodology/approach – A short overview is given of the two main approaches to equivalence in the literature. These are integrated and used to distinguish sources of cultural bias in the various stages of the research process. Findings – The highest levels of equivalence most often established are construct equivalence and partial measurement equivalence, implying that distributions of scores obtained in various countries cannot be interpreted at face value. To understand cross‐cultural differences better, researchers should investigate why higher levels of equivalence could not be established; this can be done best by including elements from both the conceptual and the measurement approach to equivalence. Practical implications – This study can help marketing managers to establish the extent to which consumer perceptions can be considered equal across countries. Moreover, it helps researchers to determine causes of unequivalence and relate these to concrete stages in the research process. Originality/value – Integration of the two main approaches to equivalence will lead to a better understanding of the validity of cross‐cultural differences and similarities. This should lead to improved decision making in international marketing.

Journal

European Journal of MarketingEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 2005

Keywords: International marketing; Market research; Bias

References

  • Qualitative Marketing Research
    Carson, D.; Gilmore, A.; Perry, C.; Gronhaug, K.
  • International Marketing Research
    Craig, C.S.; Douglas, S.P.
  • International Marketing Research
    Douglas, S.P.; Craig, C.S.
  • Methodological issues in cross‐cultural marketing research
    Malhotra, N.K.; Agarwal, J.; Peterson, M.
  • Benchmarking international marketing research practice in UK agencies – preliminary evidence
    Reynolds, N.L.
  • How specific are perceptual skills?
    Serpell, R.

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