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Equality and access to human rights for people with both learning disability and mental illness needs

Equality and access to human rights for people with both learning disability and mental illness... Governments mediate, through their architecture of machinery and policy, access to rights and, by extension, to services. There is limited but growing recognition in both the UK and other European governments that individuals' power to negotiate this access is limited by the structural inequality of groups in certain named categories of disadvantage (inter alia, people with disabilities), and they are adapting their machinery to provide the support they require to ‘level the playing field’. However, intersectionality (identities which cut across these recognised categories of disadvantage) prevents those affected from using such mechanisms effectively. Those whose disability impairs their mental awareness and understanding face an additional barrier. The paper explores how this limits the rights of those with both learning disabilities and mental illness, and looks at some of the ways in which this problem is being addressed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities Emerald Publishing

Equality and access to human rights for people with both learning disability and mental illness needs

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1753-0180
DOI
10.1108/17530180200800011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Governments mediate, through their architecture of machinery and policy, access to rights and, by extension, to services. There is limited but growing recognition in both the UK and other European governments that individuals' power to negotiate this access is limited by the structural inequality of groups in certain named categories of disadvantage (inter alia, people with disabilities), and they are adapting their machinery to provide the support they require to ‘level the playing field’. However, intersectionality (identities which cut across these recognised categories of disadvantage) prevents those affected from using such mechanisms effectively. Those whose disability impairs their mental awareness and understanding face an additional barrier. The paper explores how this limits the rights of those with both learning disabilities and mental illness, and looks at some of the ways in which this problem is being addressed.

Journal

Advances in Mental Health and Learning DisabilitiesEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2008

Keywords: Learning disabilities; Mental health needs; Equality; Human rights

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