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Environmentally responsive supply chains Learnings from the Indian auto sector

Environmentally responsive supply chains Learnings from the Indian auto sector Purpose – The arrival of global manufacturers has brought about new challenges such as environmental concerns and sustainability of supply chains. The purpose of this paper is to identify implementation level, major drivers, various practices and performance of environmentally and socially‐conscious supply chain management (SCM) in the context of the automobile industry in India. Design/methodology/approach – The literature is reviewed to understand various challenges/barriers to the adoption of green supply chain management (GSCM) practices; statistical analysis of various drivers, practices and performance of environmentally and socially conscious supply chain is carried out in the case of an automobile cluster in central India. Personal interviews are conducted and a structured questionnaire is used for data collection from 30 organizations including original equipment manufacturers, first‐ and second‐tier suppliers. Findings – Environmentally and socially responsive supply chains are in the early adoption stages in India. Companies studied in the auto cluster are not adequately addressing these measures in supply chain design and operations; though awareness and inclination to adopt has been on the rise – actual implementation lacks a holistic approach. Originality/value – Investigation of GSCM along with social concerns is rarely done in the Indian context. This paper will offer valuable insights for managers in understanding the consequences of non‐compliance, especially with the Indian automobile industry recently becoming global. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Advances in Management Research Emerald Publishing

Environmentally responsive supply chains Learnings from the Indian auto sector

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0972-7981
DOI
10.1108/09727980911007181
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The arrival of global manufacturers has brought about new challenges such as environmental concerns and sustainability of supply chains. The purpose of this paper is to identify implementation level, major drivers, various practices and performance of environmentally and socially‐conscious supply chain management (SCM) in the context of the automobile industry in India. Design/methodology/approach – The literature is reviewed to understand various challenges/barriers to the adoption of green supply chain management (GSCM) practices; statistical analysis of various drivers, practices and performance of environmentally and socially conscious supply chain is carried out in the case of an automobile cluster in central India. Personal interviews are conducted and a structured questionnaire is used for data collection from 30 organizations including original equipment manufacturers, first‐ and second‐tier suppliers. Findings – Environmentally and socially responsive supply chains are in the early adoption stages in India. Companies studied in the auto cluster are not adequately addressing these measures in supply chain design and operations; though awareness and inclination to adopt has been on the rise – actual implementation lacks a holistic approach. Originality/value – Investigation of GSCM along with social concerns is rarely done in the Indian context. This paper will offer valuable insights for managers in understanding the consequences of non‐compliance, especially with the Indian automobile industry recently becoming global.

Journal

Journal of Advances in Management ResearchEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 28, 2009

Keywords: India; Automotive industry; Supply chain management; Corporate social responsibility

References